Show simple item record

Behavioral ecology of Pseudacris crucifer.

dc.contributor.authorHwang, Carolynen_US
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Bobbyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBentley, Meredithen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUMBS Campusen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T23:23:57Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T23:23:57Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/54987
dc.description.abstractTadpoles develop quickly; thus, they are ideal subjects for studying behavioral ecology. Adaptations should allow them to increase fitness when exposed to less than optimal conditions. Behavior can consequently provide clues to a species' survival strategy. To test this, reactions of larval spring peeper frogs, Pseudacris crucifer, to environment color, refuge, food, predation, and illumination were tested in simulated environments. It was observed that tadpoles alter behavior according to the combination of variables presented. They showed significant preference for black environments to white environments, open water to refuge with or without food, and intense light to darkness (p<0.05). Tadpoles avoided predators when they were present although they seldom seemed completely cautious of them. This study supports theories that P. crucifer is better at defending itself against predation rather than competing with other species for resources. Little was known about zebra mussel distribution in Douglas Lake before this study. UMBS faculty members became aware of their presence in 2002, but their presence in Douglas Lake was not officially documented. Douglas Lake was monitored for zebra mussels by the Michigan Sea Grant in 1993, 1994, 1998, and 1999, but no adults were found (MSG, 2003). The results of this study were reported to the Michigan Sea Grant. It is my hope that zebra mussel populations and their impacts on the Douglas Lake ecosystem will continue to be monitored in the future.en_US
dc.format.extent536747 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartDiagram or Illustrationen_US
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.otherAMPHIBIANSen_US
dc.subject.otherVERTEBRATESen_US
dc.subject.otherFROGSen_US
dc.subject.otherPEEPERSen_US
dc.subject.otherPREDATIONen_US
dc.subject.otherCOLEOPTERAen_US
dc.subject.otherINSECTSen_US
dc.subject.otherDYTISCUSen_US
dc.subject.otherPREYen_US
dc.subject.otherFORAGINGen_US
dc.subject.otherTADPOLESen_US
dc.subject.otherAVOIDANCEen_US
dc.titleBehavioral ecology of Pseudacris crucifer.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/54987/1/3428.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 3428.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


Files in this item

Show simple item record