Comparison of the historic and modern distribution and abudance of the Eastern Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris Vieillot), a species extirpated and reintroduced in Michigan.

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dc.contributor.author Pierle, Matt en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-06-14T23:29:18Z
dc.date.available 2007-06-14T23:29:18Z
dc.date.issued 2004 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/55026
dc.description.abstract The Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is a species both prized and protected because of it's utility and cultural significance. In pre-Columbian times, Michigan, the Eastern subspecies of the Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris Vieillot) enjoyed periods of abundance extensively inhabiting the forest and savannah complex of the southern Lower Peninsula as far north as the Tension Zone and numbering around 94,000 birds in the equivalent of approximately 38 of Michigan's 83 counties. With European contact, westward expansion, the Civil War and market hunting the species experienced a severe decline in both range and numbers and in 1897 extirpation from the state. After a nearly 60 year absence from the state, a series of reintroduction efforts again established Wild Turkey populations in Michigan. Since 1954 Wild Turkey dispersal and management has allowed this species to spread beyond its original range. Over 150,000 Wild Turkeys now inhabit over 73 counties in the state. Its current distribution and abundance indicate that Wild Turkeys now survive and reproduce more in the northern part of the Lower Peninsula and in areas of the central and western Upper Peninsula, north of their historical range. Turkey distribution and abundance are influenced by factors including disease, predation, poult mortality, climate and a suite of habitat variables. Hunting, game management and supplemental feeding now play a major role in the life and survival of this species which seems to exist at the intersection of nature and management. en_US
dc.format.extent 1738008 bytes
dc.format.extent 3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.subject Birds en_US
dc.subject.other BIRDS en_US
dc.subject.other VERTEBRATES en_US
dc.subject.other LIFE en_US
dc.subject.other HISTORY en_US
dc.subject.other MANAGEMENT en_US
dc.subject.other NATURAL en_US
dc.subject.other BREEDING en_US
dc.subject.other BIOLOGY en_US
dc.subject.other NESTING en_US
dc.subject.other HOME en_US
dc.subject.other RANGE en_US
dc.subject.other HABITAT en_US
dc.subject.other ANALYSIS en_US
dc.subject.other LONGEVITY en_US
dc.subject.other MORTALITY en_US
dc.title Comparison of the historic and modern distribution and abudance of the Eastern Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris Vieillot), a species extirpated and reintroduced in Michigan. en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Natural Resource and Environment en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Science en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Biological Station, University of Michigan en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampus Ann Arbor en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/55026/1/3468.pdf en_US
dc.description.filedescription Description of 3468.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station. en_US
dc.owningcollname Biological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)
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