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Michigan's two-track roads and rivers: edge effects for Ovenbirds and Red-eyed Vireos?

dc.contributor.authorBorowske, Alyssaen_US
dc.coverage.spatialMaple River - East Branchen_US
dc.coverage.spatialBeavertail Creeken_US
dc.coverage.spatialGates Bogen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUMBS Burn Plotsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T23:37:46Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T23:37:46Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/55086
dc.description.abstractDeclines in neotropical songbird populations have often been attributed to fragmentation, especially the related effects of decreased patch size and increased amount of exposed edge. Negative edge effects have been proposed to be the result of a variety of causes such as increased nest predation and parasitism and decreased prey availability. Studies on edge effects have been largely inconclusive and few generalizations have been made about how edges and edge effects should be defined. Little is known about the degree to which roads, especially narrow un-maintained roads, have corresponding edge effects to fragmentation-sensitive bird species. This study used mist-netting to look at the separate and combined effects of two-track road edges and river edges on ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus) and red-eyed vireos (Vireo olivaceus) in Northern Michigan. Negative edge effects within 50 meters of two-tracks were found for red-eyed vireos but not ovenbirds (p=<.05 and .9, respectively). However the results suggest that ovenbirds may actually experience edge effects for a minimum of 100 meters; further studies should evaluate greater distances from two-track edges. Red-eyed vireo distributions were not influenced by proximity to rivers (p=.9), but female and hatch-year ovenbirds were caught most frequently at sites with riparian habitat (p=<.05) although, within those sites, only hatch -year ovenbirds were caught with greater frequency at nets within 50 meters of the river (p=<.05). This distribution suggests that riparian habitat may counteract two-track edge effects. To be most effective, conservation efforts in Northern Lower Michigan and similar areas should focus on, but not be limited to habitats with river systems.en_US
dc.format.extent904676 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartMapen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate Research Exper.en_US
dc.subject.classificationAspenen_US
dc.subject.classificationNorthern Hardwoodsen_US
dc.subject.classificationBogen_US
dc.subject.otherBIRDSen_US
dc.subject.otherPOPULATIONen_US
dc.subject.otherABUNDANCEen_US
dc.subject.otherFRAGMENTATIONen_US
dc.subject.otherEDGEen_US
dc.subject.otherHABITATen_US
dc.subject.otherANALYSISen_US
dc.subject.otherPATCHen_US
dc.subject.otherSIZEen_US
dc.titleMichigan's two-track roads and rivers: edge effects for Ovenbirds and Red-eyed Vireos?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/55086/1/3531.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 3531.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


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