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Impact of estrogen receptor expression and other clinicopathologic features on tamoxifen use in ductal carcinoma in situ

dc.contributor.authorHird, R. Barryen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, Alfred Een_US
dc.contributor.authorCimmino, Vincent M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDiehl, Kathleen A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSabel, Michael S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKleer, Celinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHelvie, Mark A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchott, Anne F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Daniel F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Lisa A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-11T18:13:39Z
dc.date.available2007-07-11T18:13:39Z
dc.date.issued2006-05-15en_US
dc.identifier.citationHird, R. Barry; Chang, Alfred; Cimmino, Vincent; Diehl, Kathleen; Sabel, Michael; Kleer, Celina; Helvie, Mark; Schott, Anne; Young, Jennifer; Hayes, Daniel; Newman, Lisa (2006). "Impact of estrogen receptor expression and other clinicopathologic features on tamoxifen use in ductal carcinoma in situ." Cancer 106(10): 2113-2118. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/55220>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0008-543Xen_US
dc.identifier.issn1097-0142en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/55220
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=16596655&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Recent data have demonstrated that benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen therapy for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is limited to estrogen receptor (ER)-positive lesions. The objective of the current study was to correlate clinicopathologic features of DCIS with ER expression and the impact of this information on tamoxifen counseling. METHODS Women with DCIS who were treated from 2001 to 2004 were evaluated. Routine ER staining was initiated in January 2003. RESULTS Ninety-four women (mean age, 57.6 years) were analyzed. The mean DCIS size was 0.98 cm. ER-staining was performed in 55 lesions, and 76% were ER-positive. All Grade 1 and 2 DCIS lesions were ER-positive, compared with 54% of high-grade lesions ( P <.001); no other clinicopathologic feature significantly predicted ER status. Overall, 58 patients (62%) were offered tamoxifen, and the rates were similar for the pre-ER and post-ER staining periods. In the pre-ER staining period, surgical treatment and grade were associated with offering tamoxifen (75% of patients who underwent breast conservation vs. 40% of patients who underwent mastectomy; P = .03; 78% of patients with Grade 1 or 2 lesions vs. 45% of patients with Grade 3 lesions; P = .04). In the post-ER staining period, however, only ER status was correlated significantly with offering tamoxifen (71% of patients with ER-positive lesions vs. 31% of patients with ER-negative lesions; P = .01). Approximately 66% of patients who were offered tamoxifen agreed to treatment (approximately 33% of the total DCIS study sample). No clinicopathologic features predicted for tamoxifen acceptance by patients in either the pre-ER or post-ER staining periods. CONCLUSIONS Seventy-five percent of DCIS lesions were ER-positive. ER staining significantly influenced the likelihood that clinicians would offer tamoxifen to patients with DCIS, but it had no impact on whether patients accepted treatment. Cancer 2006. © 2006 American Cancer Society.en_US
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dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherCancer Research, Oncology and Pathologyen_US
dc.titleImpact of estrogen receptor expression and other clinicopathologic features on tamoxifen use in ductal carcinoma in situen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelOncology and Hematologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPublic Healthen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDivision of Surgical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDivision of Surgical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDivision of Surgical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDivision of Surgical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDivision of Surgical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Pathology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Radiology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDivision of Surgical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDivision of Surgical Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Fax: (734) 647-9647 ; Division of Surgical Oncology, 3308 Cancer Center, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16596655en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/55220/1/21873_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.21873en_US
dc.identifier.sourceCanceren_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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