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dc.contributor.authorHull, Brooks B.
dc.contributor.authorSharp, B. M. H.
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-19T14:45:18Z
dc.date.available2007-08-19T14:45:18Z
dc.date.issued1988-02
dc.identifier.citationNew Zealand Forestry, vol. 32, no. 4, 1988, pp. 25-29 <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/55468>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0112-9597
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/55468
dc.description.abstractThe economics of deriving raw materials from forests is examined. Competitive markets are consistent with the notion of efficiency, although they may not produce results that are fair. Sustainability as an alternative criterion suffers from problems of commensurability and an inability to identify preferred options when a choice between alternative patterns of use is possible. Given a choice among a number of sustainable use rates, competitive markets satisfy both criteria. Institutional arrangements are significant variables in forestry policy because they provide a basis for competitive markets and they determine the distribution of benefits and costs associated with use.en_US
dc.format.extent2263622 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNew Zealand Institute of Foresters Inc.en_US
dc.titleForest Economics and Policyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelSocial Sciences (General)
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelSocial Sciences
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumProfessor of Economicsen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherSenior Lecturer in Resource Economics, University of Canterbury, New Zealanden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusDearbornen_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/55468/1/Hull B - 1988 - Forest Economics - NZ Forestry.pdfen_US
dc.owningcollnameSocial Sciences: Economics, Department of (UM-Dearborn)


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