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dc.contributor.authorHull, Brooks B.
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-23T13:48:46Z
dc.date.available2007-08-23T13:48:46Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.citationStudies in Economic Analysis, vol. 12, no. 1, Spring 1989, pp. 3-21 <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/55474>en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/55474
dc.description.abstractReligion serves a number of important functions, one of which is to provide an alternative to the state and to the local community in enforcing particular social behavior. As the nature of the state's power, of the influence of the local community, and of economic activity change, religious doctrine changes in a predictable manner. The behavior and doctrine of the Medieval knights and of the mendicant orders are used as examples. This essay reviews an economic theory of religion and uses the theory to explain changes in attitudes toward hell, heaven, and divine retribution in Western Europe during the Middle Ages.en_US
dc.format.extent167964 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of South Carolinaen_US
dc.subjectMiddle Agesen_US
dc.subjectProperty Rightsen_US
dc.titleReligion, Afterlife, and Property Rights in the High Middle Agesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelSocial Sciences (General)
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelSocial Sciences
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumProfessor of Economicsen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusDearbornen_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/55474/1/Hull B - 1989 - Medieval Afterlife - SEA.pdfen_US
dc.owningcollnameSocial Sciences: Economics, Department of (UM-Dearborn)


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