Predictors of inactive lifestyle among adult survivors of childhood cancer

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dc.contributor.author Ness, Kirsten K. en_US
dc.contributor.author Leisenring, Wendy M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Huang, Sujuan en_US
dc.contributor.author Hudson, Melissa M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Gurney, James G. en_US
dc.contributor.author Whelan, Kimberly en_US
dc.contributor.author Hobbie, Wendy L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Armstrong, Gregory T. en_US
dc.contributor.author Robison, Leslie L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Oeffinger, Kevin C. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-05-04T18:27:22Z
dc.date.available 2010-07-06T14:30:32Z en_US
dc.date.issued 2009-05-01 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Ness, Kirsten K; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Huang, Sujuan; Hudson, Melissa M.; Gurney, James G.; Whelan, Kimberly; Hobbie, Wendy L.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Oeffinger, Kevin C. (2009). "Predictors of inactive lifestyle among adult survivors of childhood cancer." Cancer 115(9): 1984-1994. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/62154> en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0008-543X en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1097-0142 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/62154
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=19224548&dopt=citation en_US
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Participation in physical activity is important for childhood cancer survivors, because inactivity may compound cancer/treatment-related late effects. However, some survivors may have difficulty participating in physical activity, and these individuals need to be identified so that risk-based guidelines for physical activity, tailored to specific needs, can be developed and implemented. The objectives of the current study were to document physical activity patterns in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort, to compare the physical activity patterns with siblings in the CCSS and with a population-based sample from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and to evaluate associations between diagnosis, treatment, and personal factors in terms of the risk for an inactive lifestyle. METHODS: Percentages of participation in recommended physical activity were compared among survivors, siblings, and population norms. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the associations between cancer diagnosis and therapy, sociodemographics, and the risk for an inactive lifestyle. RESULTS: Participants included 9301 adult survivors of childhood cancer and 2886 siblings. Survivors were less likely than siblings (46% vs 52%) to meet physical activity guidelines and were more likely than siblings to report an inactive lifestyle (23% vs 14%). Medulloblastoma (35%) and osteosarcoma (27%) survivors reported the highest levels of inactive lifestyle. Treatments with cranial radiation or amputation were associated with an inactive lifestyle as were being a woman, black race, older age, lower educational attainment, underweight or obese status, smoking, and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Childhood cancer survivors were less active than a sibling comparison group or an age- and sex-matched population sample. Survivors who are at risk for an inactive lifestyle should be considered high priority for developing and testing of intervention approaches. Cancer 2009. © 2009 American Cancer Society. en_US
dc.format.extent 251946 bytes
dc.format.extent 3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.publisher Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company en_US
dc.subject.other Life and Medical Sciences en_US
dc.subject.other Cancer Research, Oncology and Pathology en_US
dc.title Predictors of inactive lifestyle among adult survivors of childhood cancer en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.robots IndexNoFollow en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Oncology and Hematology en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Public Health en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Health Sciences en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Department of Pediatrics and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee ; Fax: (901) 495-5845 ; Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, Mail Code 735, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38138 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Cancer Prevention and Clinical Statistics, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Department of Oncology, Cancer Survivorship Division, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Division of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Division of Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York en_US
dc.identifier.pmid 19224548 en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/62154/1/24209_ftp.pdf
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/cncr.24209 en_US
dc.identifier.source Cancer en_US
dc.owningcollname Interdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed
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