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Living with Conflict: The Effect of Community Organizations, Economic Assets, and Mass Media Consumption on Migration During Armed Conflict.

dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Nathalie E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-07T16:20:44Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.date.available2010-01-07T16:20:44Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.submitteden_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/64592
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is an examination of migration during armed conflict and the individual and community characteristics that shape this relationship. Although evidence consistently shows that conflict affects migration on an aggregate level, there is little theoretical or empirical work at the micro-level that addresses the individual- and community-level determinants that make people willing and able to migrate during conflict. To address this gap, I develop multi-dimensional theoretical models that analyze migration decisions at the individual level and the role of community organizations, employment and economic status, and consumption of mass media in systematically altering the way individuals react to armed conflict. Using the recent Maoist insurrection in Nepal as a case study, I empirically test these theoretical models with prospective survey data and detailed records of specific violent events. I find that specific violent events have different effects on migration, with gun battles increasing and bomb blasts decreasing the likelihood of migration. Within this context, community organizations can provide economic and social support that mitigates the influence of conflict on individuals’ lives. I find evidence that organizations such as markets, employers, farmers’ cooperatives, and religious institutions dampened the effect of violent events on migration. Economic indicators also moderated the conflict-migration relationship. Location specific characteristics that an individual could lose upon migration, such as employment and land ownership, decreased migration after any violent event. Conversely livestock, which are a more liquid asset, increased migration after violent events. Finally, results show that use of the mass media positively affected migration during the conflict, likely through the provision of information and influencing exaggerated perceptions of threat. Overall, this dissertation contributes to the academic literature through the construction and empirical testing of theoretical models of individual migration decisions during armed conflict. I demonstrate that individuals react to violence differently, depending upon their individual and community circumstances which affect their experience and perceptions of violence and the utility and ability to migrate away. I also demonstrate that detailed measurement of the specific events that constitute armed conflict is necessary to effectively study subsequent behaviors.en_US
dc.format.extent448338 bytes
dc.format.extent1373 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectMigrationen_US
dc.subjectArmed Conflicten_US
dc.subjectNepalen_US
dc.subjectMass Mediaen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Organizationsen_US
dc.subjectLand Ownershipen_US
dc.titleLiving with Conflict: The Effect of Community Organizations, Economic Assets, and Mass Media Consumption on Migration During Armed Conflict.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesisdegreenamePh.D.en_US
dc.description.thesisdegreedisciplineSociologyen_US
dc.description.thesisdegreegrantorUniversity of Michigan, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAxinn, William G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Barbara A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFricke, Thomas E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalea, Sandroen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPopulation and Demographyen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelSociologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/64592/1/natw_1.pdf
dc.owningcollnameDissertations and Theses (Ph.D. and Master's)


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