The Roles of Experiences of Discrimination, Collective Identification, and Structural Awareness in Own-group and Ally Activism.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Curtin, Nicola en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-09-15T17:18:08Z
dc.date.available NO_RESTRICTION en_US
dc.date.available 2011-09-15T17:18:08Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/86520
dc.description.abstract This dissertation examined how social location (e.g. gender, race, and age), as well as experiences of discrimination, collective identification, and structural awareness of group inequalities— which were assumed to be shaped by women’s particular locations—relate to own-group and ally activism in a sample of older middle-aged heterosexual Black and White women graduates of the University of Michigan. Three types of activism were included as outcomes: Women’s Rights activism (measure of own-group activism), and Lesbian and Gay Rights activism and International Human Rights activism (both defined as ally activism for the current sample). It was hypothesized that personal experiences of discrimination would be associated with both own-group and ally activism via their relationships with two intervening variables: collective identification (for own-group activism) and structural awareness of group inequalities (for both own-group and ally activism). Although previous research has examined the role of collective identification in predicting activism, the current project examined the independent roles of discrimination, collective identification, and structural awareness of group inequalities in predicting own-group activism; and the role of structural awareness of group inequalities and discrimination in ally activism. Results replicated previous findings that collective identification plays a key role in predicting own-group activism. Additional results showed that discrimination exerted significant indirect effects on own-group activist engagement, via its relationship with collective identification. Structural awareness of group inequalities played a significant role in predicting ally activism, though it did not predict own-group activism. Experiences of personal discrimination also predicted ally activism, independent of the effect of structural awareness of group inequalities. Results highlighted the value of considering the role that life experiences, such as discrimination, play in predicting activism both on behalf of one’s own group, as well as in alliance with groups to which one does not belong. Further, they showed that structural awareness of group inequalities plays a key role in understanding ally engagement. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Activism en_US
dc.subject Identity en_US
dc.subject Personality en_US
dc.subject Middle-age en_US
dc.subject Structural Awareness en_US
dc.subject Social Change en_US
dc.title The Roles of Experiences of Discrimination, Collective Identification, and Structural Awareness in Own-group and Ally Activism. en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.thesisdegreename Ph.D. en_US
dc.description.thesisdegreediscipline Psychology and Women's Studies en_US
dc.description.thesisdegreegrantor University of Michigan, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Stewart, Abigail J. en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Cole, Elizabeth Ruth en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Cortina, Lilia M. en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Winter, David G. en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Social Sciences en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/86520/1/nicurtin_1.pdf
dc.owningcollname Dissertations and Theses (Ph.D. and Master's)
 Show simple item record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)


Search Deep Blue

Advanced Search

Browse by

My Account

Information

Available Now


MLibrary logo