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A Multiple-Group Path Analysis of the Role of Social Marginality on Self-Rated Physical Health among U.S. Latina/o Adults: An Intersectional Perspective.

dc.contributor.authorMolina, Kristine M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-15T17:18:18Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.date.available2011-09-15T17:18:18Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.submitteden_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/86525
dc.description.abstractFew studies examine differential exposure to forms of social marginality, and how they contribute to health outcomes among Latina/os. The first aim of this dissertation was to examine Latina/os’ differential exposure to “dimensions” of social marginality (everyday discrimination and subjective social status in the U.S.). The second aim was to examine how health effects of social marginality unfold across Latina/os. Thirdly, this study examined the extent to which gender and ethnicity moderated relations between everyday discrimination, subjective social status in the U.S., psychological distress, and self-rated physical health. Data (N=2,554) were drawn from the National Latino and Asian American Study, which is comprised of Cuban women/men, Puerto Rican women/men, Mexican women/men, and Other Latina/o women/men. Findings revealed that Puerto Rican men reported greater levels of everyday discrimination than other Latina/os, whereas Cuban women reported the least. On the other hand, Mexican men evidenced lower levels of subjective social status in the U.S., whereas Puerto Rican men reported the highest levels. Multiple-group path analysis revealed that psychological distress mediated the relation between discrimination and self-rated physical health among all Latina/o subgroups except for Cuban and Puerto Rican males. On the other hand, subjective social status in the U.S. mediated the relation between discrimination and self-rated physical health only for Puerto Rican males. Gender and ethnicity moderated relations in the model. Specifically, in the face of perceived discrimination, being a Cuban male was associated with a higher perceived social status in the U.S. compared to Puerto Rican women. Conversely, in the face of perceived discrimination, being a Puerto Rican female was associated with a lower subjective social status compared to Cuban men. Moreover, in the context of perceived discrimination, being a Mexican female was associated with greater levels of psychological distress compared to Cuban men. First, these findings underscore the importance of taking into account how multiple identities shape experiences of social marginality. Second, they highlight the multiple pathways linking discrimination to health for different Latina/o subgroups. Thirdly, results show for whom discrimination may be most detrimental. These findings have implications for understanding within-group processes and how we respond to subgroup-specific needs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectLatina/Os in the U.S.en_US
dc.subjectDiscriminationen_US
dc.subjectSubjective Social Statusen_US
dc.subjectMental Healthen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Rated Physical Healthen_US
dc.subjectIntersectionality and Social Marginalityen_US
dc.titleA Multiple-Group Path Analysis of the Role of Social Marginality on Self-Rated Physical Health among U.S. Latina/o Adults: An Intersectional Perspective.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesisdegreenamePh.D.en_US
dc.description.thesisdegreedisciplinePsychology and Women's Studiesen_US
dc.description.thesisdegreegrantorUniversity of Michigan, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlegria, Margaritaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMahalingam, Ramaswamien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCortina, Lilia M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPerez, Debra Joyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSpencer, Michaelen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHumanitiesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/86525/1/kmolina_1.pdf
dc.owningcollnameDissertations and Theses (Ph.D. and Master's)


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