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  • Dataset of live-cell movies of single PolC-PAmCherry molecules in Bacillus subtilis cells with high and low fluorescent backgrounds.

    Work
    Creator: Isaacoff, Benjamin P., Li, Yilai, Lee, Stephen A., and Biteen, Julie S.
    Description: This is the experimental data referenced in our manuscript entitled “SMALL-LABS: An algorithm for measuring single molecule intensity and position in the presence of obscuring backgrounds .” These live-cell single-molecule imaging movies were used as a test of the SMALL-LABS single-molecule image analysis algorithm. The dataset comprises two movies; each one is provided both as a .tif stack and as an .avi file. The movie called “low_bg” has a standard low background, and the movie called “high_bg” includes a high fluorescent background produced by an external 488-nm laser.
  • Flowing into the unknown: inferred paleodrainages for studying the ichthyofauna of Brazilian coastal rivers - paleodrainages shapefiles

    Work
    Creator: Thomaz, Andréa T. (UMICH) and Knowles, L. Lacey (UMICH)
    Description: The eastern coastal basins of Brazil are a series of small and isolated rivers that drain directly into the Atlantic Ocean. During the Pleistocene, sea-level retreat caused by glaciations exposed the continental shelf, resulting in enlarged paleodrainages that connected rivers that are isolated today. Using Geographic Information System (GIS), we infer the distribution of these paleodrainages, and their properties for the east Brazilian coast. Here, we publicly make available the shapefiles that demonstrate the paleodrainage structure along the Brazilian coast during the largest sea-level retreats in the Pleistocene, the riverine vectors during the same period and the coastal line for a drop of -125m in the sea.
  • Spatially-explicit model code and outputs of Bighead and Silver carp growth rate potential in Lake Michigan

    Work
    Creator: Alsip, Peter
    Description: Percent Weight Change Data: The model was run continuously on a daily time step for seasonal intervals (Spring: March thru May; Summer: June thru August; Fall: September thru November) as well as contiguously from Spring to Fall to assess total growth over the likely growing season (March thru November). CSV files represent the simulated weight change (%) of Bighead and Silver Carp for the respective time periods associated with the file name. Initial fish mass for each seasonal interval and growing season was 4350 g for Silver Carp and 5480 g for Bighead Carp. Maximum and mean total weight change (%) was determined for three depth ranges (near surface depths [NS]: 0 – 10 m; deep chlorophyll layer depths [DCL]: 10 - 50 m; and whole water column [WC]). Coordinates are in decimal degrees. File naming convention: speciesSeasonWtChange (e.g. bigheadFallWtChange = % weight change of Bighead Carp from September through November) , Monthly Habitat Quality Data: Rdata files contain matrices of Bighead or Silver carp growth rate potential as represented as a mass-proportional growth rate (gram of carp/gram of carp/day [g/g/d]) for the 15th day of each month. Habitats with growth rate potential >= 0 g/g/d were deemed suitable. Matrix attributes: Rows: Row numbers refer to the spatial node with 20 equally-spaced vertical layers. Columns: Columns 1-20 refer to the growth rate potential value for each vertical layer of each node. Vertical layers are evenly spaced based on the total depth of the water column for each node. Depth for each node can be found in the grid attributes data file. Columns 21 ("meanG") and 22 ("Gmax") represent the average and maximum growth rate potential, respectively, of the fish across the whole water column for the corresponding node. File naming convention: species_MonthNumber (e.g. silver_06 = Silver carp growth rate potential in June) Spatial coordinates for each node can be found in the grid attributes data files., Grid attributes data: This Rdata file provides the spatial reference data and other grid attributes. Coordinates are provided in UTM (x & y) and latitude and longitude (decimal degrees). Depth (meters) for each node is listed in this file. , GRP Model code: Details bioenergetics equations, foraging equation, functions for running the model on a monthly time-step and daily time step, and functions for basic analyses. Model is coded in R., and The simulated input data (prey and temperature) used to run our model is not included in this data set. Instead we provide the model code, grid attributes, and outputs of the model. The readRDS() function (R Base Package v.3.5.1) is required to read in .Rdata files in R.
  • Video data of predation and parasitism by arthropods on small vertebrates in lowland Peruvian Amazon

    Work
    Creator: Grundler, Michael C, Grundler, Maggie G, and Herrera, V.
    Description: Nighttime and diurnal surveys in the lowland Peruvian Amazon of Los Amigos Biological Station were conducted in order to describe herpetological diversity at this site. As a result of these surveys, the predation event between a Pamphobeteus sp. and Marmosops sp. and the myiasis of Ranitomeye uakarii were observed. The video footage was recorded in order to document these interesting interactions between arthropod predators and parasites and vertebrate prey and hosts, and are included for publication in the short communication "Ecological interactions between arthropods and small vertebrates in a lowland Amazon rainforest" in the journal Amphibian and Reptile Conservation.
  • Single-molecule microscopy image data and analysis files for "Ultra-specific and Amplification-free Quantification of Mutant DNA by Single-molecule Kinetic Fingerprinting"

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    Creator: Hayward, Stephen L. , Lund, Paul E., Kang, Qing, Johnson-Buck, Alexander , Tewari, Muneesh, and Walter, Nils G.
    Description: This work contains the experimental data and associated analysis that are described in the research publication entitled "Ultra-specific and Amplification-free Quantification of Mutant DNA by Single-molecule Kinetic Fingerprinting". This work contains multiple zip files, each of which represents one of the principal experiment groups presented in the publication. Each experiment group contains movie and analysis files corresponding to various experimental conditions related to that experiment group.
  • Results from simulations of earthquake rupture in fault zones with along-strike heterogeneity

    Work
    Creator: Huang, Yihe
    Description: Geological and geophysical observations reveal along-strike fault zone heterogeneity on major strike-slip faults, which can play a significant role in earthquake rupture propagation and termination. I present 2D dynamic rupture simulations to demonstrate rupture characteristics in such heterogeneous fault zone structure. The modeled rupture is nucleated in a damaged fault zone and propagates on a preexisting fault towards the zone of intact rocks. There is an intermediate range of nucleation lengths that only allow rupture to spontaneously propagate in the damaged fault zone but not in a homogeneous medium. I find that rupture with an intermediate nucleation length tends to stop when it reaches the zone of intact rocks, especially when the rupture propagation distance in the damaged fault zone is relatively short and when the damaged fault zone is relatively narrow or smooth in the fault-normal direction. Pronounced small-scale heterogeneity within the damaged fault zone also contributes to such early rupture termination. In asymmetric fault zones bisected by a bimaterial fault, rupture moving in the direction of slip of faster rocks tends to terminate under the same conditions as in symmetric fault zones, whereas rupture moving in the direction of slip of slower rocks can penetrate into the zone of intact rocks. Break-through rupture is allowed when a sufficiently-large asperity is located at the edge of the zone of intact rocks. The results suggest the along-strike fault zone heterogeneity can play a critical role in seismicity distribution. The data set contains multiple folders of simulation results from the SEM2DPACK that demonstrate the above findings. The folder name includes the model parameters in each simulation as explained in the README file. The Flt01_sem2d.data file in the folder documents the slip, slip rate and stresses from each simulation. The files are also explained in the manual of SEM2DPACK (http://web.gps.caltech.edu/~ampuero/soft/users_guide_sem2dpack.pdf). Please refer to section 4.6 in the manual and use “sem2d_read_fault.m” in the POST folder of SEM2DPACK to plot the results.
  • Anthropogenic Aerosol indirect effects in cirrus clouds

    Work
    Creator: Penner, Joyce E., Zhou, Cheng, Garnier, Anne, and Mitchell, David
    Description: This data set contains the scripts and data sets needed to create the 9 figures in the referenced publication.
  • Downloaded IAAF Sprint Results in all Heats for 2004 - 2016 Olympics for both Men and Women

    Work
    Creator: Mirshams Shahshahani, Payam
    Description: Investigating minimum human reaction times is often confounded by the motivation, training, and state of arousal of the subjects. We used the reaction times of athletes competing in the shorter sprint events in the Athletics competitions in recent Olympics (2004-2016) to determine minimum human reaction times because there's little question as to their motivation, training, or state of arousal. The reaction times of sprinters however are only available on the IAAF web page for each individual heat, in each event, at each Olympic. Therefore we compiled all these data into two separate excel sheets which can be used for further analyses.
  • Multi-Stage Attack Graph Security Games: Heuristic Strategies, with Empirical Game-Theoretic Analysis --- Dataset

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    Creator: Nguyen, Thanh H., Wright, Mason, Wellman, Michael P., and Singh, Satinder
    Description: In this work , we study the problem of allocating limited security countermeasures to protect network data from cyber-attacks, for scenarios modeled by Bayesian attack graphs. We consider multi-stage interactions between a network administrator and cybercriminals, formulated as a security game. We propose parameterized heuristic strategies for the attacker and defender and provide detailed analysis of their time complexity. Our heuristics exploit the topological structure of attack graphs and employ sampling methods to overcome the computational complexity in predicting opponent actions. Due to the complexity of the game, we employ a simulation-based approach and perform empirical game analysis over an enumerated set of heuristic strategies. Finally, we conduct experiments in various game settings to evaluate the performance of our heuristics in defending networks, in a manner that is robust to uncertainty about the security environment.
  • Data from "Genomic evidence of a widespread southern distribution during the Last Glacial Maximum for two eastern North American hickory species"

    Work
    Creator: Bemmels, Jordan B. and Dick, Christopher W.
    Description: Raw SNP genotypes are provided in STRUCTURE format, with a maximum of one SNP reported per ddRAD locus. The files "caryco_SNP.str" and "caryov_SNP.str" are genotypes for Carya cordiformis and Carya ovata, respectively. The first column of each file is the individual name, the second column is the population (see original publication for information on population locations), and the remaining columns are genotypes of individual SNPs. Rows represent individuals, with the diploid genotypes contained on two lines per individual. Missing data are entered as "0" (zero). The first row is a header with a unique identifier for each SNP. and Occurrence records for each species are provided in the file "occs_carya.csv" and contain the latitude and longitude of each record.
  • Maximum Spreading Speed for Magnetopause Reconnection: Model Dataset

    Work
    Creator: Welling, Daniel and Walsh, Brian
    Description: The goal of this simulation was to examine the spread of magnetic reconnection across the dayside magnetopause upon the arrival of a tangential discontinuity of the interplanetary magnetic field from a purely northward to southward configuration. Simple solar wind conditions were used to give us input into the system. A very high resolution grid setup was used in BATS-R-US.
  • Data in support of the study "Modeled Response of Greenland Snowmelt to the Presence of Biomass Burning-Based Absorbing Aerosols in the Atmosphere and Snow"

    Work
    Creator: Ward, Jamie L., Flanner, Mark G., Bergin, Mike, Dibb, Jack E., Polashenski, Chris M., Soja, Amber J., Thomas, Jennie L.
    Description: Biomass burning produces smoke aerosols that are emitted into the atmosphere. Some smoke constituents, notably black carbon (BC), are highly effective light-absorbing aerosols (LAA). Emitted LAA can be transported to high albedo regions like the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) and affect local snowmelt. In the summer, the effects of LAA in Greenland are uncertain. To explore how LAA affect GrIS snowmelt and surface energy flux in the summer, we conduct idealized global climate model simulations with perturbed aerosol amounts and properties in the GrIS snow and overlying atmosphere. The in-snow and atmospheric aerosol burdens we select range from background values measured on the GrIS to unrealistically high values. This helps us explore the linearity of snowmelt response and to achieve high signal-to-noise ratios. With LAA operating only in the atmosphere, we find no significant change in snowmelt due to the competing effects of surface dimming and tropospheric warming. Regardless of atmospheric LAA presence, in-snow BC-equivalent mixing ratios greater than ~60 ng/g produce statistically significant snowmelt increases over much of the GrIS. We find that net surface energy flux changes correspond well to snowmelt changes for all cases. The dominant component of surface energy flux change is solar energy flux, but sensible and longwave energy fluxes respond to temperature changes. Atmospheric LAA dampen the magnitude of solar radiation absorbed by in-snow LAA when both varieties are simulated. In general, the significant melt and surface energy flux changes we simulate occur with LAA quantities that have never been recorded in Greenland.
  • Supporting data and scripts for the paper "Variability in the location of High Frequency Oscillations during prolonged intracranial EEG recordings"

    Work
    Creator: Gliske, Stephen V and Stacey, William C
    Description: This data is part of a large program to translate detection and interpretation of HFOs into clinical use. A zip file is included which contains hfo detections, metadata, and Matlab scripts. The matlab scripts analyze this input data and produce figures as in the referenced paper (note: the blind source separation method is stochastic, and so the figures may not be exactly the same). A file "README.txt" provides more detail about each individual file within the zip file.
  • Model outputs for "Multi-species and multi-fluid MHD approaches for the study of ionospheric escape at Mars"

    Work
    Creator: Regoli, Leonardo H.
    Description: The data corresponds to outputs from the Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM), the multi-species magnetohydrodynamics (MS-MHD) and multi-fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MF-MHD) codes used during the study presented in "Multi-species and multi-fluid MHD approaches for the study of ionospheric escape at Mars" by Regoli et al.
  • Effective Fetch and Relative Exposure Index Maps for the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Work
    Creator: Mason, Lacey A., Riseng, Catherine M., Layman, Andrew J., and Jensen, Robert
    Description: Wind exposure is a key physical driver of coastal systems in aquatic environments influencing circulation and wave dynamics. A measure of wind exposure is fetch, the distance over which wind can travel across open water. In large lake systems, such as the Laurentian Great Lakes, estimating fetch has proved to be difficult due to their vast size and complex topobathymetry. Here we describe the development of two spatially discrete indicators of exposure to provide a more accurate indicator of influence of wind exposure in the nearshore of the Laurentian Great Lakes. We summarized wind data from offshore buoys and leveraged existing tools to calculate effective fetch and relative exposure index (effective fetch scaled by mean wind speed) at a 30 m grid cell resolution. We validated these models by comparing our exposure maps to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Wave Information Studies models and found general agreement. These exposure maps are available for public download for the years 2004-2014.
  • Event List for "Interchange Injections at Saturn: Statistical Survey of Energetic H+ Sudden Flux Intensifications"

    Work
    Creator: Azari, A. R.
    Description: ABSTRACT: We present a statistical study of interchange injections in Saturn's inner and middle magnetosphere focusing on the dependence of occurrence rate and properties on radial distance, partial pressure, and local time distribution. Events are evaluated from over the entirety of the Cassini mission’s equatorial orbits between 2005 and 2016. We identified interchange events from CHarge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) H+ data using a trained and tested automated algorithm, which has been compared with manual event identification for optimization. We provide estimates of interchange based on intensity, which we use to investigate current inconsistencies in local time occurrence rates. This represents the first automated detection method of interchange, estimation of injection event intensity, and comparison between interchange injection survey results. We find the peak rates of interchange occur between 7 - 9 Saturn radii and that this range coincides with the most intense events as defined by H+ partial particle pressure. We determine that nightside occurrence dominates as compared to the dayside injection rate, supporting the hypothesis of an inversely dependent instability growth rate on local Pedersen ionospheric conductivity. Additionally, we observe a slight preference for intense events on the dawn side, supporting a triggering mechanism related to large-scale injections from downtail reconnection. Our observed local time dependence paints a dynamic picture of interchange triggering due to both the large-scale injection driven process and ionospheric conductivity. Within this repository we provide a readme file (description of data file and usage) and the event list provided as a .txt file. The event list includes start and stop times, comparison to previous surveys, and the average location of events identified. Additional formats are available on request. , Further details on this method can be found in "Interchange Injections at Saturn: Statistical Survey of Energetic H+ Sudden Flux Intensifications" by Azari et al., 2018 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JA025391. , and Curation notes: The files 'events_CORRECTED.txt' and 'readme_UPDATED.rtf' were added to this record July 31 and August 7, 2018 and supersede the previous data file 'events.txt' and readme file 'readme.rtf'. The file 'events.txt' uploaded May 9, 2018 should not be used, as this file contains a duplication error where the last column, InAllSurveys, is incorrectly presented as a duplicate of the column InAnySurvey. 'readme_UPDATED.rtf' contains additional context and updated references to the new data file.
  • Bayesian Population Correlation: A probabilistic approach to comparing detrital zircon age distributions

    Work
    Creator: Tye, Alexander R, Wolf, Aaron S, and Niemi, Nathan A
    Description: Detrital zircon age distributions provide robust insights into past sedimentary systems, but these age distributions are often complex and multi-peaked, with sample sizes too small to confidently resolve population distributions. This limited sampling hinders existing quantitative methods for comparing detrital zircon age distributions, which show systematic dependence on the sizes of compared samples. The proliferation of detrital zircon studies motivates the development of more robust quantitative methods. We present the first attempt, to our knowledge, to infer probability model ensembles (PMEs) for samples of detrital zircon ages using a Bayesian method. Our method infers the parent population age distribution from which a sample is drawn, using a Monte Carlo approach to aggregate a representative set of probability models that is consistent with the constraints that the sample data provide. Using the PMEs inferred from sample data, we develop a new estimate of correspondence between detrital zircon populations called Bayesian Population Correlation (BPC). Tests of BPC on synthetic and real detrital zircon age data show that it is nearly independent from sample size bias, unlike existing correspondence metrics. Robust BPC uncertainties can be readily estimated, enhancing interpretive value. When comparing two partially overlapping zircon age populations where the shared proportion of each population is independently varied, BPC results conform almost perfectly to expected values derived analytically from probability theory. This conformity of experimental and analytical results permits direct inference of the shared proportions of two detrital zircon age populations from BPC. We provide MATLAB scripts to facilitate the procedures we describe.
  • Model results for "Modeling study of geospace system response to the solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement on March 17, 2015"

    Work
    Creator: Ozturk, Dogacan
    Description: The global magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (M-I-T) system is intrinsically coupled and susceptible to external drivers such as solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements. In order to understand the large-scale dynamic processes in the M-I-T system due to the compression from the solar wind, the 17 March 2015 sudden commencement was studied in detail using global numerical models. This data set is comprised of the simulation data generated from these models. and NOTE: The following changes were made to this dataset on March 28, 2018. First, two mp4 files were added. Second, the symbol representing "degree" was not rendering properly in the README file. The symbols were removed and replaced with the word "degree". Third, the metadata in the "methodology" and "description" fields were revised for content and clarity. On April 16, 2018 a citation to the corresponding article was added to the metadata record.
  • Low-Fe(III) Greenalite Was a Primary Mineral from Neoarchean Oceans (Raw Data)

    Work
    Creator: Johnson, Jena E.
    Description: Note: The "Readme_Metadata" file was updated on March 15, 2018 to include a citation to the related article making use of this data and was reformatted to be presented as a pdf file rather than as a docx file. and This data set is comprised of synchrotron-based X-ray transmission and absorption spectroscopy data as well as X-ray diffraction patterns that were performed to characterize the best-preserved examples of nanoscale iron silicate mineral inclusions from 2.5 billion-year-old Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) and ferruginous cherts.
  • Data in support of the study "Climate response to negative greenhouse gas radiative forcing in polar winter"

    Work
    Creator: Flanner, Mark
    Description: Greenhouse gas (GHG) additions to Earth’s atmosphere initially reduce global outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), thereby warming the planet. In select environments with temperature inversions, however, increased GHG concentrations can actually increase local OLR. Negative top-of-atmosphere and effective radiative forcing (ERF) from this situation give the impression that local surface temperatures could cool in response to GHG increases. Here we consider an extreme scenario in which GHG concentrations are increased only within the warmest layers of winter near-surface inversions of the Arctic and Antarctic. We find, using a fully coupled Earth system model, that the underlying surface warms despite the GHG addition exerting negative ERF and cooling the troposphere in the vicinity of the GHG increase. This unique radiative forcing and thermal response is facilitated by the high stability of the polar winter atmosphere, which inhibits thermal mixing and amplifies the impact of surface radiative forcing on surface temperature. These findings also suggest that strategies to exploit negative ERF via injections of short-lived GHGs into inversion layers would likely be unsuccessful in cooling the planetary surface. and Note: A revised data description file was added to this work on April 11, 2018 containing additional information about the data set than was provided in the original description. Additional keywords and a full citation to the related article were added as well.
  • Predicting Crystal Structures using Digital Alchemy Inverse Materials Design and the Random Forest Technique of Machine Learning

    Work
    Creator: Geng, Yina, Van Anders, Greg, and Glotzer, Sharon C.
    Description: The data are the 13 target structures used in developing our model for predicting colloidal crystal structures from the geometries of particular shapes. The target structures are: simple cubic (SC), body-centered cubic (BCC), face-centered cubic (FCC), simple chiral cubic (SCC), hexagonal (HEX-1-0.6), diamond (D), graphite (G), honeycomb (H), body-centered tetragonal (BCT-1-1-2.4), high-pressure Lithium (Li), Manganese (beta-Mn), Uranium (beta-U), Tungsten (beta-W). At least nine simulations were run on each of the target structures. All of the data are formatted as .pos files.
  • Computer Data from Ross Thesis

    Work
    Creator: Mathews, Elizabeth and Verhoff, Frank
    Description: Each pdf is an electronic version of the paper output for each experiment. Each text file is the electronic version of the data on the computer cards for each experiment. These text files are directly readable by Excel. Once in Excel, the data can be manipulated as desired. Additional information is in the theses.
  • Input files for the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model for 2010

    Work
    Creator: Ridley, Aaron
    Description: These files (2010_gitm_input_files.tgz) were used to run GITM for 2010 for each month. GITM paper is here: (10.1016/j.jastp.2006.01.008 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jastp.2006.01.008>) GITM code is in file gitm_170809.tgz
  • Centimeter-Scale Electron Diffusion in Photoactive Organic Heterostructures

    Work
    Creator: Forrest, Stephen R., Panda, Anurag, Qu, Yue, Che, Xiaozhou, Coburn, Caleb, and Burlingame, Quinn
    Description: Mathematica Diffusion Simulation: Programmed by Coburn, Caleb. Simulation of diffusion in organic heterostructures, including least square fits and statistical goodness of fit analysis. Used to calculate fits to transient data in Fig 1, 3 and Extended Data Fig.2. Example data file included for download Matlab Montecarlo simulation: Programmed by Coburn, Caleb. Montecarlo simulation of charge diffusion on a cubic lattice to determine lateral diffusion length as a function of barrier height, assuming thermionic emission over the barrier. Matlab 2D Diffusion Simulation:Programmed by Coburn, Caleb. Modified from BYU Physics 430 Course Manual. Simulates diffusion around a film discontinuity, such a cut. Used to generate fits to Extended Data Fig. 1
  • Crop rotations for increased soil carbon: perenniality as a guiding principle

    Work
    Creator: Blesh, Jennifer and King, Alison E.
    Description: This dataset contains three data files used in: King, A.E. and J. Blesh, 2017. Crop rotations for increased soil carbon: perenniality as a guiding principle. Ecological Applications. There are also three corresponding metadata files. The file “CRMA 2017 Main.csv” contains data for the control and treatment rotations used to construct pairwise comparisons for meta-analysis, response ratios calculated for soil organic carbon concentration, and change in carbon input. The dataset also includes management, soil, and other environmental characteristics for each site. The file “CRMA 2017 Diversity x Nitrogen.csv” contains data used to test whether N fertilizer inputs mediated the effect of functional diversity on SOC concentrations. The file “CRMA Annual grain.csv” contains data used to test for effects of crop rotation species diversity (one vs. two species, or two vs. three species) on SOC concentrations and C input (i.e., for the “grain-only” rotations). The dataset also includes management, soil, and other environmental characteristics for each site. The corresponding metadata files: “CRMA 2017 Main_metadata.csv”, “CRMA 2017 Diversity x Nitrogen_metadata.csv”, and “CRMA Annual grain _metadata.csv” provide a detailed description of all variables in each dataset. Note: On Jan 12, 2018 the following information was added to the three metadata files: the name of the data file the metadata refers to, an explanation as to the meaning of blank cells in the data file, a full citation to the paper where the author describes her findings and contact information for the author.
  • WRF-Chem Central US - Hygroscopicity tests

    Work
    Creator: Kawecki, Stacey and Steiner, Allison
    Description: WRF-Chem model
  • Large-eddy simulation (LES) model simulations

    Work
    Creator: Li, Yang and Steiner, Allison
    Description: Case 2 of Li et al. (2016) LES simulations for the DISCOVER-AQ 11 campaign, including three different grid resolutions (96, 197 and 320 grid cell resolutions), plus simulations at the 192 grid resolution with and without aqueous chemistry
  • Large-eddy simulation of BVOC during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ

    Work
    Creator: Steiner, Allison and Li, Yang
    Description: Case 1: A fair weather condition; Case 2: A convective event; Case 3: A polluted event with high temperature and convection
  • Understanding Ecosystem Services Adoption by Natural Resource Managers and Research Ecologists: Survey Data

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    Creator: Engel, Daniel D. , Evans, Mary Anne, Low, Bobbi S., and Schaeffer, Jeff
    Description: This dataset was compiled as an attempt to understand how natural resource managers and research ecologists in the Great Lakes region integrate the ecosystem services (ES) paradigm into their work. The following text is the adapted abstract from a thesis associated with this data. Ecosystem services, or the benefits people obtain from ecosystems, have gained much momentum in natural resource management in recent decades as a relatively comprehensive approach to provide quantitative tools for improving decision-making and policy design. However, to date we know little about whether and how natural resource practitioners, from natural resource managers to research ecologists (hereafter managers and ecologists respectively), have adopted the ES paradigm into their respective work. Here, we addressed this knowledge gap by asking managers and ecologists about whether and how they have adopted the ES paradigm into their respective work. First, we surveyed federal, state, provincial and tribal managers in the Great Lakes region about their perception and use of ES as well as the relevance of specific services to their work. Although results indicate that fewer than 31% of the managers said they currently consider economic values of ES, 79% of managers said they would use economic information on ES if they had access to it. Additionally, managers reported that ES-related information was generally inadequate for their resource management needs. We also assessed managers by dividing them into identifiable groups (e.g. managers working in different types of government agencies or administrative levels) to evaluate differential ES integration. Overall, results suggest a desire among managers to transition from considering ES concepts in their management practices to quantifying economic metrics, indicating a need for practical and accessible valuation techniques. Due to a sample of opportunity at the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC), we also evaluated GLSC research ecologists’ integration of the ES paradigm because they play an important role by contributing requisite ecological knowledge for ES models. Managers and ecologists almost unanimously agreed that it was appropriate to consider ES in resource management and also showed convergence on the high priority ES. However, ecologists appeared to overestimate the adequacy of ES-related information they provide as managers reported the information was inadequate for their needs. This divergence may reflect an underrepresentation of ecological economists in this system who can aid in translating ecological models into estimates of human well-being. As a note, the dataset for the research ecologists has had some data removed as it could be considered personally identifiable information due to the small sample size in that population. The surveys associated with both datasets have also been included in PDF format. Curation Notes: Three files were added to the data set on Dec 21, 2017. Two csv files: "Ecosystem services and Research Ecologists - Data Index.csv" and "Ecosystem services and Research Managers - Data Index.csv" and one text file: "Ecosystem Services Adoption Readme.txt". The file names of the original four files were altered to replace an ampersand with the word "and".
  • Regional Climate Model simulations

    Work
    Creator: Steiner, Allison and Bryan, Alex
    Description: Included are RegCM simulations driven by three different types of boundary conditions 1. ERA - present day only (1979-2005) 2. GFDL - present day (1978-2005) and future (2041-2065) 3. HadGEM - present day (1978-2005) and future (2041-2065) Each directory has three files with monthly averaged values: ATM: includes 4D (t,z,y,x) atmospheric fields (pressure, winds, temperature, specific humidity, cloud water) and some 3D fields (t,y,x) precipitation, soil temperature, soil water SRF: includes 3D (t,y,x) surface variables (surface pressure, 10m winds, drag coefficient, surface temperature, 2m air temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, runoff, snow, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, surface radiation components (SW, LW), PBL height, albedo, sunshine duration) RAD: includes 4D radiative transfer variables (SW and LW heating, TOA fluxes, cloud fraction, ice water content) clm_h0 files: CLM land surface files, includes canopy variables, surface fluxes, soil moisture by layers, etc. "
  • Data from: Functional traits in cover crop mixtures: biological nitrogen fixation and multifunctionality

    Work
    Creator: Blesh, Jennifer
    Description: This dataset contains three data files used in: Blesh, J. 2017. Functional traits in cover crop mixtures: biological nitrogen fixation and multifunctionality. Journal of Applied Ecology. There are also three corresponding metadata files. The file “Ecosystem_functions_soil_species.csv” contains data organized by farm, treatment, replicate block, and species combining the fall and spring sampling time points. These data include aboveground biomass, nitrogen and carbon content, and biological nitrogen fixation for the plant species. The dataset also includes measured soil characteristics for each farm site. The file “Ecosystem_functions_soil_treatment.csv” contains data organized by farm, treatment, and replicate block for the fall and spring sampling time points combined. These data include aboveground biomass, nitrogen and carbon content, and biological nitrogen fixation aggregated by treatment. The dataset also includes measured soil characteristics for each farm site. The file “Traits_unstandardized.csv” contains individual plant trait data, a subset of which were used to calculate an index of functional diversity after they were standardized to have zero mean and unit variance. These data are organized by farm, treatment, replicate block, and species. The corresponding metadata files: “Ecosystem_functions_soil_species_metadata.csv”, “Ecosystem_functions_soil_treatment_metadata.csv”, and “Traits_unstandardized_metadata.csv” provide a detailed description of all variables in each dataset and any abbreviations used. Note: On Dec 19th 2017, the format of the files was changed to csv to aid preservation. The following information was added to the three metadata files: the name of the data file the metadata refers to, an explanation as to the meaning of blank cells in the data file, a full citation to the paper where the author describes her findings and contact information for the author.
  • JGR-Space-2012-Data

    Work
    Creator: Moldwin, Mark B
    Description: Tab delimited file containing the records of all papers published in JGR-Space Physics in 2012. The records were pulled from Thomsen-Reuters ISI-Web-of-Science on June 3, 2016 including citations. Gender was identified independently by the creator of the file.
  • Gelada foraging ecology in the Simien Mountains, Ethiopia

    Work
    Creator: Jarvey, Julie C
    Description: This includes data used for analysis for the publication: "Graminivory and fallback foods: Annual diet profile of geladas (Theropithecus gelada) living in the Simien Mountains National Park, Ethiopia". A revised version of the "foraging.scans.xlsx" file was uploaded as a csv file on Dec 13, 2017 to include the addition of the "crop" as category in the "Diet.Item" column. Previously "crop" was included in the "other" category. An updated version of the "readme_foraging.scans.txt" was uploaded on Dec 13, 2017 to account for this change, provide additional information on variables in the "season" column and to include contact information for the creator of the data set. Revised versions of two other files "readme_rainfall.txt" and "readme_underground.samples.txt" were also uploaded on Dec 13, 2017. Both revisions include additional information to account for missing variables and contact information for the creator of the data set. The original files are retained in this data set and are marked as being the originals in the file name. Note: A citation to the related article was added to the metadata on March 12, 2018.
  • Improvement of Mars surface snow albedo modeling in LMD Mars GCM with SNICAR

    Work
    Creator: Singh, Deepak
    Description: This includes data for all the plots and maps I created for my paper publication entitled "Improvement of Mars surface snow albedo modeling in LMD Mars GCM with SNICAR".
  • The KSU-UMD Dataset for Benchmarking for Audio Forensic Algorithms

    Work
    Creator: Malik, Hafiz and Khan, Muhammad Khurran, King Saud University
    Description: Details of the microphone used for data collection, acoustic environment in which data was collected, and naming convention used are provided here. 1 - Microphones Used: The microphones used to collect this dataset belong to 7 different trademarks. Table (1) illustrates the number of used Mics of different trademarks and models. Table 1: Trademarks and models of Mics Mic Trademark Mic Model # of Mics Shure SM-58 3 Electro-Voice RE-20 2 Sennheiser MD-421 3 AKG C 451 2 AKG C 3000 B 2 Neumann KM184 2 Coles 4038 2 The t.bone MB88U 6 Total 22 2- Environment Description: A brief description of the 6 environments in which the dataset was collected is presented here: (i) Soundproof room: a small room (nearly 1.5m × 1.5m × 2m), which is closed and completely isolated. With an exception of a small window in the front side of the room which is made of glass, all the walls of the room are made of wood and covered by a layer of sponge from the inner side, and the floor is covered by carpet. (ii) Class room: standard class room (6m × 5m × 3m). (iii) Lab: small lab (4m × 4m × 3m). All the walls are made of glasses and the floor is covered by carpet. The lab contains 9 computers. (iv) Stairs: is in the second floor. The place of recording is 3m × 5m (v) Parking: is the college parking. (vi) Garden: is an open space outside the buildings. 3- Naming Convention: This set of rules were followed as a naming convention to give each file in the dataset a unique name: (i) The file name is 19 characters long, and consists of 5 sections separated by underscores. (ii) The first section is of 3 characters indicates the Microphone trademark. (iii) The second section of 4 characters indicates the microphone model as in table (2). (iv) The third section of 2 characters indicates a specific microphone within a set of microphones of the same trademark and model, since we have more than one microphone of the same trademark and model. (v) The fourth section of 2 characters indicates the environment, where Soundproof room --> 01 Class room --> 02 Lab --> 03 Stairs --> 04 Parking --> 05 Garden --> 06 (vi) The fifth section of 2 characters indicates the language, where Arabic --> 01 English --> 02 Chinese --> 03 Indonesian --> 04 (vii) The sixth section of 2 characters indicates the speaker. Table 2: Microphones Naming Criteria Original Mic Trademark and model --> Naming Convenient Shure SM-58 --> SHU_0058 Electro-Voice RE-20 --> ELE_0020 Sennheiser MD-421 --> SEN_0421 AKG C 451 --> AKG_0451 AKG C 3000 B --> AKG_3000 Neumann KM184 --> NEU_0184 Coles 4038 --> COL_4038 The t.bone MB88U --> TBO_0088 For example: SEN_0421_02_01_02_03 is an English file recorded by speaker number 3 in the soundproof room using microphone number 2 of Sennheiser MD-421
  • Influence of invasive quagga mussels, phosphorus loads, and climate on spatial and temporal patterns of productivity in Lake Michigan: A biophysical modeling study

    Work
    Creator: Rowe, Mark D.
    Description: Animation files show the 12-month “baseline” simulations for 2000, 2005, and 2010 (see Table 1 of the paper cited above). temp_1_animation.wmv: Surface temperature Chl_1_animation.wmv: Surface chlorophyll-a PO4_1_animation.wmv: Surface total dissolved phosphorus Detritus_1_animation.wmv: Surface detritus concentration (particulate organic carbon, excluding phytoplankton and zooplankton). Zooplankton_1_animation.wmv: Surface zooplankton carbon concentration MRATION_1_animation.wmv: Rate of food assimilated by mussels, according to the product f_a F_A P in Equation 2, expressed as mg phytoplankton carbon per mg mussel biomass carbon per day × 100%. BIO_M_1_animation.wmv: Simulated mussel biomass in mg ash-free-dry-mass m^-2
  • Atmospheric CO2 time series derived from CESM NEP and GEOS-Chem pulse response CO2

    Work
    Creator: Keppel-Aleks, Gretchen and Liptak, Jessica
    Description: -CESM_bdrd _NEP_pulse_response_CO2.nc contains time series from the ‘FullyCoupled’ simulation -CESM_bdrcs_NEP_pulse_response_CO2.nc contains time series from the ‘NoRad’ simulation -CESM_bdrd_pftcon_NEP_pulse_response_CO2.nc contains data from the ‘NoLUC’ simulation -CESM_bdrd_Regional_Fluxes_NEP.nc contains NEP time series for each terrestrial source region from the FullyCoupled simulation - CESM_bdrcs_Regional_Fluxes_NEP.nc contains NEP time series for each terrestrial source region from the CESM ‘NoRad’ simulation - CESM_bdrd_pftcon_Regional_Fluxes_NEP.nc contains NEP time series for each terrestrial source region from the CESM ‘NoLUC’ simulation The 3-letter station IDs, latitudes, and longitudes of the sample locations are: ID Latitude (ºN) Longitude (ºE) 1. BRW    71.3 203.4 2. ZEP    78.9 11.9 3. SHM    52.7 174.1 4. THD    41.1 235.8 5. TAP    36.7 126.1 6. BMW    32.3 295.1 7. MLO    19.5 204.4 8. POCN15 15.0 215.0 9. ALT    82.5 297.5 10. BHD    -41.4 174.9 11. EIC    -27.2 250.6 12. GMI    13.4 144.7 13. HUN    47.0 16.7 14. IZO  28.3  343.5 15. LLN    23.5 120.9 16. NAT    -5.8 324.7 17. WLG    36.3 100.9 18. HBA    -75.6 333.8 19. BKT    -0.20 100.3 20. UUM    44.5 111.1 21. CGO    -40.7 144.5 22. SDZ    40.7 117.1 23. ASC    -8.0 345.6 24. SEY    -4.7 55.5 25. POCS20 -20.0 186.0 26. POCS35 -35.0 180.0 27. PSA    -64.9 296.0 28. SYO    -69.0 39.6 29. CHR    1.7 202.8 30. KEY    25.7 279.8 31. BAL    55.4 17.2 32. HPB    47.8 11.0 33. LMP    35.5 12.6 34. NMB    -23.6 15.0 35. RPB    13.2 300.2 36. WIS    30.0 35.1 37. POCS10 -10.0 199.0 38. POCN10 10.0 211.0 39. MID    28.2 182.6 40. SMO    -14.2 189.4 41. SPO    -90.0 335.2 The terrestrial CO2 source region abbreviations are: 1. NBNA 2. SBNA 3. ETNA 4. WTNA 5. CNAM 6. AMZN 7. EASA 8. WESA 9. EURO 10. SAME 11. MDAF 12. AFRF 13. SOAF 14. EABA 15. WEBA 16. SOBA 17. CNAS 18. SEAS 19. EQAS 20. AUST 21. GNLD 22. ATCA
  • WRF-Chem Central US - Urban emissions magnitude

    Work
    Creator: Steiner, A.L. and Kawecki, S.
    Description: Kansas City, MO emissions can affect a severe weather system by altering the number of CCN, which drives changes in the hydrometeor development. The hydrometeor changes affect cold pool strength, size, and propagation which ultimately determine the strength of the squall line that crosses Kansas City, MO.
  • Neighborhood effects : Information and Education Environment

    Work
    Creator: Veinot, Tiffany C, Data Driven Detroit, Gomez-Lopez, Iris N., Clarke, Phillipa J., Goodspeed, Robert, Okullo, Dolorence, and Reddy, Shruthi
    Description: The information and education environment refers to: 1) the presence of information infrastructures such as broadband Internet access and public libraries in a location; 2) a person’s proximity to information infrastructures and sources; 3) the distribution of information infrastructures, sources and in a specific location; and 4) exposure to specific messages (information content) within a specific location. Coverage for all data: 10-county Detroit-Warren-Ann Arbor Combined Statistical Area.
  • Simulation Parameters used in the Study titled "Efficient Estimation of Binding Free Energies between Peptides and an MHC Class II Molecule Using Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with a Weighted Histogram Analysis Method"

    Work
    Creator: Larson, Ronald G., Wen, Fei, Huang, Wenjun, and Huang, Ming
    Description: We provide the parameters used in Umbrella Sampling simulations reported in our study "Efficient Estimation of Binding Free Energies between Peptides and an MHC Class II Molecule Using Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with a Weighted Histogram Analysis Method", namely the set positions and spring constants for each window in simulations. Two tables are provided. Table 1 lists the names of the peptides and their corresponding sequences. Table 2 lists the parameters. The abstract of our work is the following: We estimate the binding free energy between peptides and an MHC class II molecule using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). We show that, owing to its more thorough sampling in the available computational time, the binding free energy obtained by pulling the whole peptide using a coarse-grained (CG) force field (MARTINI) is less prone to significant error induced by biased-sampling than using an atomistic force field (AMBER). We further demonstrate that using CG MD to pull 3-4 residue peptide segments while leaving the remain-ing peptide segments in the binding groove and adding up the binding free energies of all peptide segments gives robust binding free energy estimations, which are in good agreement with the experimentally measured binding affinities for the peptide sequences studied. Our approach thus provides a promising and computationally efficient way to rapidly and relia-bly estimate the binding free energy between an arbitrary peptide and an MHC class II molecule.
  • ENVIREM: ENVIronmental Rasters for Ecological Modeling version 1.0

    Work
    Creator: Title, Pascal O. and Bemmels, Jordan B.
    Description: The ENVIREM dataset v1.0 is a set of 16 climatic and 2 topographic variables that can be used in modeling species' distributions. The strengths of this dataset include their close ties to ecological processes, and their availability at a global scale, at several spatial resolutions, and for several time periods. The underlying temperature and precipitation data that went into their construction comes from the WorldClim dataset (www.worldclim.org), and the solar radiation data comes from the Consortium for Spatial Information (www.cgiar-csi.org). The data are compatible with and expand the set of variables from WorldClim v1.4 (www.worldclim.org). For more information, please visit the project website: envirem.github.io
  • Data and code files for Bing and Wittkopp MBE submission 11/22/16

    Work
    Creator: Wittkopp, Patricia J and Yang, Bing
    Description: Datafiles and code described in accompanying MS, currently in review
  • Regulation of Müller Stem Cell Properties: Insights From a Zebrafish Model, Appendix8

    Work
    Creator: Sifuentes, Christopher J
    Description: Inverse PCR and genome-walking data.
  • Regulation of Müller Stem Cell Properties: Insights From a Zebrafish Model, Appendix7

    Work
    Creator: Sifuentes, Christopher J
    Description: Linkage plots and data for mi2004 mutants.
  • Regulation of Müller Stem Cell Properties: Insights From a Zebrafish Model, Appendix6

    Work
    Creator: Sifuentes, Christopher J
    Description: Pathway data from mi2004 mutants.
  • Regulation of Müller Stem Cell Properties: Insights From a Zebrafish Model, Appendix5

    Work
    Creator: Sifuentes, Christopher J
    Description: Gene ontology data from mi2004 mutants
  • Regulation of Müller Stem Cell Properties: Insights From a Zebrafish Model, Appendix4

    Work
    Creator: Sifuentes, Christopher J
    Description: Differential expression data and genes in linked peaks in mi2004 mutants.
  • Regulation of Müller Stem Cell Properties: Insights From a Zebrafish Model, Appendix3

    Work
    Creator: Sifuentes, Christopher J
    Description: Pathway data for zebrafish regeneration and mouse degeneration models.
  • Regulation of Müller Stem Cell Properties: Insights From a Zebrafish Model, Appendix2

    Work
    Creator: Sifuentes, Christopher J
    Description: Gene ontology data from zebrafish regeneration and mouse degeneration models.
  • Regulation of Müller Stem Cell Properties: Insights From a Zebrafish Model, Appendix1

    Work
    Creator: Sifuentes, Christopher J
    Description: Differential expression data from zebrafish regeneration and mouse degeneration models.