Work Description

Title: The ethical and professional use of social media in surgery - A review of the literature Open Access Deposited

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
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Methodology
  • Comprehensive literature searches were run in Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Epub Ahead of Print, Embase.com, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in January 2017. All citations were exported to Endnote. Duplicate citations were removed in Endnote using both automated and manual processes. Five pre-identified key articles were used to generate relevant search terms and to test the effectiveness of the searches. Once all citations were collected and duplicates removed, the citations were added to DistillerSR for eligibility screening. Two screening forms were created. The first pertained to a title and abstract screen, and the second to a full-text screen of those that passed the first stage. The criteria used to determine eligibility is included. Two reviewers screened all citations during both stages of the review independently. Disagreements were resolved through discussion.
Description
  • The dataset includes the reproducible search strategies for all literature databases searched during the review, the key articles used to generate relevant search terms and test the effectiveness of the searches, the Endnote library that has all citations considered for inclusion, a flow chart describing the screening process, and the screening forms used for inclusion and exclusion.
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Depositor
  • markmac@umich.edu
Contact information
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Keyword
Citations to related material
  • Bennett K, Berlin N, MacEachern MP, Buchman S, Vercler C. (2018). The ethical and professional use of social media in surgery - A systematic review of the literature. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 142(3), 388e-398e. PMID: 30148789. https://doi.org/10.1097/prs.0000000000004692
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Last modified
  • 04/27/2020
Published
  • 09/13/2017
Language
DOI
  • https://doi.org/10.7302/Z2VH5M1H
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To Cite this Work:
MacEachern, M., Bennett, K., Preminger, A., Berlin, N., Vercler, C. (2017). The ethical and professional use of social media in surgery - A review of the literature [Data set]. University of Michigan - Deep Blue. https://doi.org/10.7302/Z2VH5M1H

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Record #1 of 24
ID: CN-01102029
AU: Al-Silwadi FM
AU: Gill DS
AU: Petrie A
AU: Cunningham SJ
TI: Effect of social media in improving knowledge among patients having fixed appliance orthodontic treatment: A single-center randomized controlled trial.
SO: American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics
YR: 2015
VL: 148
NO: 2
PG: 231-7
PM: PUBMED 26232831
PT: Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
KY: Adolescent;Communication;Ethnic Groups;Follow-Up Studies;Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice;Internet;Orthodontic Appliances;Patient Education as Topic [methods];Prospective Studies;Sex Factors;Social Media;Surveys and Questionnaires;Video Recording;Female[checkword];Humans[checkword];Male[checkword]
CC: SR-ORAL
DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2015.03.029
AB: INTRODUCTION: Research has shown that orthodontic patients are more likely to retain information presented in an audiovisual format. However, there has been little research on the effectiveness of audiovisual information provided through different routes such as the Internet. This parallel-group randomized controlled trial assessed whether provision of audiovisual information on the YouTube (Google, San Bruno, Calif) Web site to orthodontic patients undergoing fixed appliance treatment results in improved patient knowledge when compared with conventional methods of information provision. The effects of sex and ethnicity were also investigated. METHODS: Participants were recruited from the Department of Orthodontics of the Eastman Dental Hospital, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom. The patients were 13 years of age and over, with no history of orthodontic treatment, and patient and parental (where appropriate) consent were obtained. The participants were randomized into control (n = 34) and intervention (n = 33) groups using a random number table; there was stratification based on age group, with permuted blocks of 10 patients. Both groups were given routine verbal and written patient information related to fixed appliances, and the participants in the intervention group were sent 3 e-mails over 6 weeks requesting that they view a 6-minute YouTube video containing similar information but in audiovisual format. Patient knowledge was measured using identical questionnaires answered on the day of recruitment (baseline) and again 6 to 8 weeks later. The researchers were unaware of group allocations when enrolling patients and scoring questionnaires. RESULTS: Sixty participants (89.55%) completed the study. Those who completed the trial in the intervention group (n = 30) demonstrated significantly greater improvements in knowledge than did those in the control group (n = 30), scoring, on average, almost 1 point more (95% CI for the difference, 0.305-1.602; P = 0.005) on the final questionnaire. Ethnicity had a statistically significant effect on improvement in knowledge, but sex did not. No harm to any patient was noted during the trial. CONCLUSIONS: Presenting audiovisual information through the YouTube Web site to orthodontic patients resulted in a significant improvement in patient knowledge. Supplementation of verbal and written patient information with audiovisual information via the Internet is therefore worthy of consideration. REGISTRATION: National Research and Ethics Service (REC number 12/LO/0863), United Kingdom. PROTOCOL: The protocol was not published before trial commencement. FUNDING: No funding or conflict of interest to be declared.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/029/CN-01102029/frame.html

Record #2 of 24
ID: CN-01155215
AU: Cobb NK
AU: Jacobs MA
AU: Saul J
AU: Wileyto EP
AU: Graham AL
TI: Diffusion of an evidence-based smoking cessation intervention through Facebook: a randomised controlled trial study protocol.
SO: BMJ open
YR: 2014
VL: 4
NO: 1
PG: e004089
PM: PUBMED 24448847
PT: Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
KY: Evidence-Based Medicine;Research Design;Smoking Cessation;Social Media;Humans[checkword]
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004089
AB: INTRODUCTION: Online social networks represent a potential mechanism for the dissemination of health interventions including smoking cessation; however, which elements of an intervention determine diffusion between participants is unclear. Diffusion is frequently measured using R, the reproductive rate, which is determined by the duration of use (t), the 'contagiousness' of an intervention (β) and a participant's total contacts (z). We have developed a Facebook 'app' that allows us to enable or disable various components designed to impact the duration of use (expanded content, proactive contact), contagiousness (active and passive sharing) and number of contacts (use by non-smoker supporters). We hypothesised that these elements would be synergistic in their impact on R, while including non-smokers would induce a 'carrier' state allowing the app to bridge clusters of smokers.METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study is a fractional factorial, randomised control trial of the diffusion of a Facebook application for smoking cessation. Participants recruited through online advertising are randomised to 1 of 12 cells and serve as 'seed' users. All user interactions are tracked, including social interactions with friends. Individuals installing the application that can be traced back to a seed participant are deemed 'descendants' and form the outcome of interest. Analysis will be conducted using Poisson regression, with event count as the outcome and the number of seeds in the cell as the exposure.RESULTS: The results will be reported as a baseline R0 for the reference group, and incidence rate ratio for the remainder of predictors.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study uses an abbreviated consent process designed to minimise barriers to adoption and was deemed to be minimal risk by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Results will be disseminated through traditional academic literature as well as social media. If feasible, anonymised data and underlying source code are intended to be made available under an open source license.CLINICALTRIALSGOV REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01746472.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/215/CN-01155215/frame.html

Record #3 of 24
ID: CN-01169079
AU: Heppe EC
AU: Kef S
AU: Schuengel C
TI: Testing the effectiveness of a mentoring intervention to improve social participation of adolescents with visual impairments: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.
SO: Trials
YR: 2015
VL: 16
PG: 506
PM: PUBMED 26541963
PT: Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
KY: Adolescent;Adolescent Behavior;Adolescent Development;Age Factors;Disability Evaluation;Leisure Activities;Mentors;Netherlands;Personal Autonomy;Research Design;Schools;Social Behavior;Social Participation;Social Support;Surveys and Questionnaires;Time Factors;Visually Impaired Persons [psychology];Workplace;Female[checkword];Humans[checkword];Male[checkword];Young Adult[checkword]
DOI: 10.1186/s13063-015-1028-z
AB: BACKGROUND: Social participation is challenging for people with visual impairments. As a result, on average, social networks are smaller, romantic relationships formed later, educational achievements lower, and career prospects limited. Adolescents on their way towards achieving these goals may benefit from the knowledge and experience of adults who have overcome similar difficulties. Therefore, a mentoring intervention, called Mentor Support, will be set up and studied in which adolescents with visual impairments are matched with successfully social participating adults with and without visual impairments. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Mentor Support. Secondary aims are to distinguish the importance of the disability-specific experience of mentors, predictors of success, and mediating factors.METHODS/DESIGN: The effect of Mentor Support will be tested in a randomized clinical trial, using pre-test one week before starting, post-test after 12 months, and follow-up after 18 months. Participants will be referred to one of the experimental groups or the control group, and this randomization will be stratified according to country region. Three groups are included in the trial: 40 participants will receive Mentor Support by mentors with a visual impairment in combination with care-as-usual, 40 participants will receive Mentor Support by mentors without visual impairments in combination with care-as-usual, and 40 participants will receive care-as-usual only. Mentor Support consists of 12 face-to-face meetings of the mentee with a mentor with an overall time period of one year. On a weekly basis, dyads have contact via email, the Internet, or telephone. The primary outcome measure is improved social participation within three domains (work/school, leisure activities, and social relationships). Mediator variables are psychosocial functioning and self-determination. Predictors such as demographics and personality are also investigated in order to distinguish the pathways to successful social participation. Intention-to-treat and completer analyses will be conducted.DISCUSSION: The primary outcomes of this trial regard increased social participation. The study may yield insights to further improve effects of support programs to adolescents with visual impairments.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register NTR4768 (registered 4 September 2014).
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/079/CN-01169079/frame.html

Record #4 of 24
ID: CN-00896689
AU: Subašić E
AU: Schmitt MT
AU: Reynolds KJ
TI: Are we all in this together?: co-victimization,inclusive social identity and collective action in solidarity with the disadvantaged.
SO: The British journal of social psychology
YR: 2011
VL: 50
NO: 4
PG: 707-25
PM: PUBMED 22122028
XR: EMBASE 22122028
PT: Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
KY: Adolescent;Cooperative Behavior;Crime Victims;Goals;Social Identification;Social Justice;Vulnerable Populations;Adult[checkword];Female[checkword];Humans[checkword];Male[checkword];Young Adult[checkword]
DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8309.2011.02073.x
AB: Common experience of injustice can be a potent motivator of collective action and efforts to achieve social change - and of such efforts becoming more widespread. In this research, we propose that the effects of co-victimization on collective action are a function of inclusive social identity. Experiment 1 (N= 61) demonstrated that while presence (compared to absence) of co-victimization positively predicted consumer (i.e., participants) willingness to act collectively in solidarity with sweatshop workers, this effect was mediated by inclusive social identity. In Experiment 2 (N= 120), the salience of inclusive social identity was experimentally manipulated and interacted with co-victimization to predict collective action. When inclusive social identity was salient, co-victimization enhanced collective action, including willingness to pay extra for products made ethically and in support of fair wages for workers. In contrast, collective action was attenuated when co-victimization took place in the absence of inclusive social identity. Implications for understanding when co-victimization is transformed into common fate and political solidarity with the disadvantaged are discussed.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/689/CN-00896689/frame.html

Record #5 of 24
ID: CN-01071908
AU: Clyde JW
AU: Domenech Rodriguez MM
AU: Geiser C
TI: Medical professionalism: an experimental look at physicians' Facebook profiles.
SO: Medical education online
YR: 2014
VL: 19
PG: 23149
PM: PUBMED 24947922
XR: EMBASE 24947922
PT: Journal: Article
KY: adolescent; adult; age; aged; article; facebook; female; health behavior; human; male; middle aged; *patient; *perception; *physician attitude; professionalism; professionalism scale; psychological aspect; sex difference; *social network; socioeconomics; young adult
AB: Use of social networking services (SNS) is on the rise. While many users sign in for personal purposes, it is not uncommon for professionals to connect over SNSs with clients, students, and patients. The present study used an experimental approach to examine how medical doctors' SNS profiles impacted potential patients' impressions of professionalism. Participants (N=250 students) were randomly assigned to view one of six Facebook profiles. Profiles were populated with 1) solely professional material, 2) personal material that was strictly healthy, or 3) personal material that included unhealthy behavior. Profiles portrayed a male or female physician resulting in a total of six experimental conditions. Medical professionalism was measured with the First Impressions of Medical Professionalism (FIMP) scale, specifically developed for this study. There was a large and statistically significant main effect for profile type, F(2, 250)=54.77, p<0.001, p(2)=0.31. Post hoc tests indicated that personal profiles that contained healthy behavior were rated as most professional followed by profiles with strictly professional content. Personal unhealthy profiles were rated as least professional. Additionally, female profiles consistently received higher professionalism ratings across all three profile types [F(1, 250)=5.04, p=0.026, p(2)=0.02]. Our results suggest that a physician's SNS profile affects a patient's perception of that physician's medical professionalism. A personal, healthy profile may augment a patient's perception of that physician's character virtues if the profile content upholds the decorum of the medical field.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/908/CN-01071908/frame.html

Record #6 of 24
ID: CN-00811077
AU: Bosslet GT
AU: Torke AM
AU: Hickman SE
AU: Terry CL
AU: Helft PR
TI: The patient-doctor relationship and online social networks: results of a national survey.
SO: Journal of general internal medicine
YR: 2011
VL: 26
NO: 10
PG: 1168-74
PM: PUBMED 21706268
PT: Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
KY: Attitude of Health Personnel;Cohort Studies;Health Surveys [methods];Internet [ethics];Internship and Residency [ethics];Physician-Patient Relations [ethics];Physicians [ethics] [psychology];Social Networking;United States;Adult[checkword];Female[checkword];Humans[checkword];Male[checkword];Middle Aged[checkword];Young Adult[checkword]
DOI: 10.1007/s11606-011-1761-2
AB: BACKGROUND: The use of online social networks (OSNs) among physicians and physicians-in-training, the extent of patient-doctor interactions within OSNs, and attitudes among these groups toward use of OSNs is not well described. OBJECTIVE: To quantify the use of OSNs, patient interactions within OSNs, and attitudes toward OSNs among medical students (MS), resident physicians (RP), and practicing physicians (PP) in the United States. DESIGN/SETTING: A random, stratified mail survey was sent to 1004 MS, 1004 RP, and 1004 PP between February and May 2010. MEASUREMENTS: Percentage of respondents reporting OSN use, the nature and frequency of use; percentage of respondents reporting friend requests by patients or patients' family members, frequency of these requests, and whether or not they were accepted; attitudes toward physician use of OSNs and online patient interactions. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 16.0% (19.8% MS, 14.3% RP, 14.1% PP). 93.5% of MS, 79.4% of RP, and 41.6% of PP reported usage of OSNs. PP were more likely to report having visited the profile of a patient or patient's family member (MS 2.3%, RP 3.9%, PP 15.5%), and were more likely to have received friend requests from patients or their family members (MS 1.2%, RP 7.8%, PP 34.5%). A majority did not think it ethically acceptable to interact with patients within OSNs for either social (68.3%) or patient-care (68.0%) reasons. Almost half of respondents (48.7%) were pessimistic about the potential for OSNs to improve patient-doctor communication, and a majority (79%) expressed concerns about maintaining patient confidentiality. CONCLUSION: Personal OSN use among physicians and physicians-in-training mirrors that of the general population. Patient-doctor interactions take place within OSNs, and are more typically initiated by patients than by physicians or physicians-in-training. A majority of respondents view these online interactions as ethically problematic.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/077/CN-00811077/frame.html

Record #7 of 24
ID: CN-01101376
AU: Caperchione CM
AU: Kolt GS
AU: Savage TN
AU: Rosenkranz RR
AU: Maeder AJ
AU: Vandelanotte C
AU: Duncan MJ
AU: Itallie A
AU: Tague R
AU: Mummery WK
TI: WALK 2.0: examining the effectiveness of Web 2.0 features to increase physical activity in a 'real world' setting: an ecological trial.
SO: BMJ open
YR: 2014
VL: 4
NO: 10
PG: e006374
PM: PUBMED 25304191
PT: Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
KY: Australia;Behavior Therapy;Body Height;Body Weight;Exercise;Health Promotion [methods];Internet;Motor Activity;Quality of Life;Self Efficacy;User-Computer Interface;Humans[checkword]
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006374
AB: INTRODUCTION: Low levels of health-enhancing physical activity require novel approaches that have the potential to reach broad populations. Web-based interventions are a popular approach for behaviour change given their wide reach and accessibility. However, challenges with participant engagement and retention reduce the long-term maintenance of behaviour change. Web 2.0 features present a new and innovative online environment supporting greater interactivity, with the potential to increase engagement and retention. In order to understand the applicability of these innovative interventions for the broader population, 'real-world' interventions implemented under 'everyday conditions' are required. The aim of this study is to investigate the difference in physical activity behaviour between individuals using a traditional Web 1.0 website with those using a novel Web 2.0 website.METHODS AND ANALYSIS: In this study we will aim to recruit 2894 participants. Participants will be recruited from individuals who register with a pre-existing health promotion website that currently provides Web 1.0 features (http://www.10000steps.org.au). Eligible participants who provide informed consent will be randomly assigned to one of the two trial conditions: the pre-existing 10 000 Steps website (with Web 1.0 features) or the newly developed WALK 2.0 website (with Web 2.0 features). Primary and secondary outcome measures will be assessed by self-report at baseline, 3 months and 12 months, and include: physical activity behaviour, height and weight, Internet self-efficacy, website usability, website usage and quality of life.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has received ethics approval from the University of Western Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee (Reference Number H8767) and has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (Reference Number 589903). Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications, academic conferences and local community-based presentations.TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12611000253909, WHO Universal Trial Number: U111-1119-1755.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/376/CN-01101376/frame.html

Record #8 of 24
ID: CN-01081436
AU: Jayaram M
AU: Bodart AY
AU: Sampson S
AU: Zhao S
AU: Montgomery AA
AU: Adams CE
TI: To tweet or not to tweet about schizophrenia systematic reviews (TweetSz): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.
SO: BMJ open
YR: 2015
VL: 5
NO: 7
PG: e007695
PM: PUBMED 26159452
PT: Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
KY: Blogging [utilization];Data Collection;Prospective Studies;Review Literature as Topic;Schizophrenia;Humans[checkword]
CC: SR-SCHIZ
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007695
AB: INTRODUCTION: The Cochrane Schizophrenia Group (CSzG) has produced and maintained systematic reviews of effects of interventions for schizophrenia and related illness. Each review has a Plain Language Summary (PLS), for those without specialised knowledge, and an abstract, which are freely available from The Cochrane Library (https://summaries.cochrane.org). Increasingly, evidence is being distributed using social media such as Twitter and Weibo (in China) alongside traditional publications.METHODS AND ANALYSIS: In a prospective two-arm, parallel, open randomised controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation ratio, we will allocate 170 published systematic reviews into the intervention group (tweeting arm/Weibo arm) versus the control group (non-tweeting arm). Reviews will be stratified by baseline access activity, defined as high (≥19 views per week, n=14), medium (4.3 to 18.99 views per week, n=72) or low (<4.3 views per week, n=84), based on Google Analytics, which will also be used for evaluating outcomes. The intervention group will have three tweets daily using Hootsuite with a slightly different accompanying text (written by CEA and AB) and a shortened Uniform Resource Locator (URL) to the PLS: a) The review title as it appears in summaries.cochrane.org, b) A pertinent extract from results or discussion sections of the abstract and c) An intriguing question or pithy statement related to the evidence in the abstract. The primary outcome will be: total number of visits to a PLS in 7 days following the tweet. Secondary outcomes will include % new visits, bounce rate, pages per visit, visit duration, page views, unique page views, time on page, entrances, exiting behaviour and country distribution.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study does not involve living participants, and uses information available in the public domain. Participants are published systematic reviews, hence, no ethical approval is required. Dissemination will be via Twitter, Weibo and traditional academic means.TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN84658943.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/436/CN-01081436/frame.html

Record #9 of 24
ID: CN-01158947
AU: Smit CR
AU: Leeuw RNH
AU: Bevelander KE
AU: Burk WJ
AU: Buijzen M
TI: A social network-based intervention stimulating peer influence on children's self-reported water consumption: A randomized control trial.
SO: Appetite
YR: 2016
VL: 103
PG: 294-301
XR: EMBASE 20160352019
PT: Journal: Article
KY: article; child; controlled study; *drinking behavior; female; *fluid intake; follow up; human; male; normal human; pilot study; program effectiveness; randomized controlled trial; self report; *social network; sociometric status; thirst; *water
DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.04.011
AB: The current pilot study examined the effectiveness of a social network-based intervention using peer influence on self-reported water consumption. A total of 210 children (52% girls; M age = 10.75 +/- SD = 0.80) were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 106; 52% girls) or control condition (n = 104; 52% girls). In the intervention condition, the most influential children in each classroom were trained to promote water consumption among their peers for eight weeks. The schools in the control condition did not receive any intervention. Water consumption, sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption, and intentions to drink more water in the near future were assessed by self-report measures before and immediately after the intervention. A repeated measure MANCOVA showed a significant multivariate interaction effect between condition and time (V = 0.07, F(3, 204) = 5.18, p = 0.002, peta2 = 0.07) on the dependent variables. Further examination revealed significant univariate interaction effects between condition and time on water (p = 0.021) and SSB consumption (p = 0.015) as well as water drinking intentions (p = 0.049). Posthoc analyses showed that children in the intervention condition reported a significant increase in their water consumption (p = 0.018) and a decrease in their SSB consumption (p < 0.001) over time, compared to the control condition (p-values > 0.05). The children who were exposed to the intervention did not report a change in their water drinking intentions over time (p = 0.576) whereas the nonexposed children decreased their intentions (p = 0.026). These findings show promise for a social network-based intervention using peer influence to positively alter consumption behaviors. Trial registration: This RCT was registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12614001179628). Study procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Radboud University (ECSW2014-1003-203).
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/947/CN-01158947/frame.html

Record #10 of 24
ID: CN-00979084
AU: Cobb NK
AU: Jacobs MA
AU: Saul J
AU: Wileyto EP
AU: Graham AL
TI: Diffusion of an evidence-based smoking cessation intervention through Facebook: A randomised controlled trial study protocol.
SO: BMJ Open
YR: 2014
VL: 4
NO: 1
XR: EMBASE 2014061398
PT: Journal: Article
KY: article; controlled study; follow up; friend; human; incidence; phase 1 clinical trial; phase 2 clinical trial; randomized controlled trial; smoking; *smoking cessation; social interaction; *social network; social support; tobacco dependence
CC: SR-TOBACCO
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004089
AB: Introduction: Online social networks represent a potential mechanism for the dissemination of health interventions including smoking cessation; however, which elements of an intervention determine diffusion between participants is unclear. Diffusion is frequently measured using R, the reproductive rate, which is determined by the duration of use (t), the 'contagiousness' of an intervention (a) and a participant's total contacts (z). We have developed a Facebook 'app' that allows us to enable or disable various components designed to impact the duration of use (expanded content, proactive contact), contagiousness (active and passive sharing) and number of contacts (use by non-smoker supporters). We hypothesised that these elements would be synergistic in their impact on R, while including non-smokers would induce a 'carrier' state allowing the app to bridge clusters of smokers. Methods and analysis: This study is a fractional factorial, randomised control trial of the diffusion of a Facebook application for smoking cessation. Participants recruited through online advertising are randomised to 1 of 12 cells and serve as 'seed' users. All user interactions are tracked, including social interactions with friends. Individuals installing the application that can be traced back to a seed participant are deemed 'descendants' and form the outcome of interest. Analysis will be conducted using Poisson regression, with event count as the outcome and the number of seeds in the cell as the exposure. Results: The results will be reported as a baseline R0 for the reference group, and incidence rate ratio for the remainder of predictors. Ethics and Dissemination: This study uses an abbreviated consent process designed to minimise barriers to adoption and was deemed to be minimal risk by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Results will be disseminated through traditional academic literature as well as social media. If feasible, anonymised data and underlying source code are intended to be made available under an open source license.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/084/CN-00979084/frame.html

Record #11 of 24
ID: CN-01134759
AU: Gliddon E
AU: Lauder S
AU: Cosgrove V
AU: Grimm D
AU: Dodd S
AU: Suppes T
AU: Berk M
TI: The pros and cons of online recruitment.
SO: Bipolar disorders
YR: 2015
VL: 17
PG: 85
XR: EMBASE 72167613
PT: Journal: Conference Abstract
KY: *bipolar disorder; *society; human; Internet; social media; registration; mental disease; randomization; informed consent; health; randomized controlled trial; institutional review; veteran; professional standard; research ethics; self help
DOI: 10.1111/bdi.12309
AB: Aims: Online recruitment in internet-based psychosocial interventions can be extremely valuable, however it also presents a unique set of challenges. This poster discusses the pros and cons of online recruitment, citing the experiences of the MoodSwings online selfhelp program for bipolar disorder. Methods: Online recruitment offers a unique set of challenges and opportunities, especially when utilizing social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter. While the internet can provide valuable recruitment resources, converting expressions of interest into research participants is not easy. In a randomized controlled trial using the MoodSwings 2.0 online intervention for bipolar disorder, social media outlets as well as well-established websites related to mental illness were utilized to aid recruitment. This project has received approval from the Barwon Health Human Research Ethics Committee and the Department of Veterans Affairs Institutional Review Board. All participants complete informed consent prior to randomization. Results: 80% of the total recruitment target of 300 was reached in 10 months. Each time trial information was shared online, the program received an influx of new registrations, totalling 1400 registrations of interest in less than 12 months. Interestingly, only 4% of registrants have gone on to become participants as of January 1, 2015. Conclusions: Online studies require different approaches to design and implementation from face-to-face studies. While online recruitment can yield a large number of potential participants in a short period of time, it remains unclear how to achieve the best results in turning expressions of interest into research participants.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/759/CN-01134759/frame.html

Record #12 of 24
ID: CN-00111547
AU: Newton JS
AU: Horner RH
TI: Feedback to staff on resident lifestyle. A descriptive analysis.
SO: Behavior modification
YR: 1995
VL: 19
NO: 1
PG: 95-117
PM: PUBMED 7880161
PT: Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
KY: Activities of Daily Living [psychology];Behavior Therapy;Cohort Studies;Feedback;Group Homes;Intellectual Disability [psychology] [rehabilitation];Life Style;Professional-Patient Relations;Quality of Life;Social Adjustment;Social Behavior;Social Support;Treatment Outcome;Humans[checkword]
CC: SR-BEHAV: SR-EPOC
AB: Providing feedback has been found to affect the behavior of staff of school and community programs. The present article presents a descriptive analysis of feedback provided to staff members concerning the lifestyle of 33 participants in 18 community residential programs in Oregon. Staff from four cohorts of programs were trained to monitor the physically and socially integrated activities experienced by program participants, and to review those data at weekly meetings. Examination of the results before and after programs had used the monitoring system indicated increases in the average number of community activities experienced by participants, the average number of activities they did with community people, the size of their social networks, and the number of individuals they identified as friends. Results were discussed in terms of the role of feedback in improving community support, the need for further research for understanding staff behaviors responsible for observed gains, and the need to better understand the relationship between observed patterns of activities and individual quality of life.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/547/CN-00111547/frame.html

Record #13 of 24
ID: CN-00589313
AU: Rivera JJ
AU: Sullivan AM
AU: Valenti SS
TI: Adding consumer-providers to intensive case management: does it improve outcome?
SO: Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
YR: 2007
VL: 58
NO: 6
PG: 802-9
PM: PUBMED 17535940
PT: Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
KY: Case Management;Combined Modality Therapy;Follow-Up Studies;Length of Stay;Mood Disorders [diagnosis] [psychology] [therapy];New York City;Patient Care Team;Patient Readmission;Patient Satisfaction;Peer Group;Psychotherapy;Psychotherapy, Group;Psychotic Disorders [diagnosis] [psychology] [therapy];Quality of Life [psychology];Social Support;Adult[checkword];Female[checkword];Humans[checkword];Male[checkword];Middle Aged[checkword]
CC: SR-COMMUN: SR-SCHIZ
DOI: 10.1176/ps.2007.58.6.802
AB: OBJECTIVE: Over the past decade, there has been increasing interest in the employment of mental health consumers in various roles as providers of services. Although integration of consumers into case management services has been studied, the roles of consumers have been poorly defined and the benefits have not been established. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether consumers enhance case management outcome through the provision of social support. METHODS: This study compared consumer-assisted and non-consumer-assisted case management with standard clinic-based care. The consumer role focused on the development of social support by using peer staff who matched the profile of participants. A total of 203 clients with severe and persistent mental illness were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions and followed for 12 months. RESULTS: All three programs yielded the same general pattern of improvement over time for symptoms, health care satisfaction, and quality of life. Clients in the three programs also showed similar but small changes in measures of social network behavior. Consumer-assisted case management was unique in its use of peer-organized activities. Non-consumer-assisted case management made greater use of individual contacts with professional staff. Standard clinic-based care relied more on group and on individual therapy. Despite these variations in the pattern of services over a 12-month period, no one program emerged as categorically superior to the others. CONCLUSIONS: Although more research is needed to determine optimal roles for consumers in mental health service delivery, a randomized trial found no evidence that the presence of consumers enhances case management outcome.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/313/CN-00589313/frame.html

Record #14 of 24
ID: CN-01128033
AU: Robins L
AU: Newby J
AU: Wilhelm K
AU: Smith J
AU: Fletcher T
AU: Ma T
AU: Finch A
AU: Campbell L
AU: Andrews G
TI: Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for depression in people with diabetes: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.
SO: BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care
YR: 2015
VL: 3
NO: 1) (no pagination
XR: EMBASE 20160020072
PT: Journal: Article
KY: adult; article; *cognitive therapy; comorbidity; *depression; *diabetes mellitus; disease severity; glycemic control; human; insulin dependent diabetes mellitus; non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus; outcome assessment; priority journal; questionnaire; randomized controlled trial; scoring system
DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2015-000144
AB: Introduction: Depression substantially contributes to the personal burden and healthcare costs of living with diabetes mellitus (DM). Comorbid depression and DM are associated with poorer quality of life, poorer selfmanagement and glycemic control, increased risk for DM complications and higher mortality rates, and higher health service utilization. Depression remains underrecognized and undertreated in people with DM, which may, in part, result from barriers associated with accessing face-to-face treatment. This study will examine the efficacy of an internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy programme for major depressive disorder (iCBTMDD) in people with DM. Methods and analysis: A CONSORT 2010 compliant, registered randomised controlled trial of the intervention (iCBT-MDD) versus a treatment as usual control group will be conducted. The study will include 100 adults aged 18 years and over with a diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 DM and self-reported symptoms that satisfy MDD which will enable us to detect a statistically significant difference with a group effect size of 0.6 at a power of 80% and significance level of p=0.05. Participants will be randomised to receive the iCBT-MDD programme immediately, or to wait 10 weeks before accessing the programme. Primary outcomes will be self-reported depression severity, DM-related distress, and glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin). Secondary outcomes will be general distress and disability, generalized anxiety, lifestyle behaviours, somatization, eating habits, alcohol use, and acceptability of the iCBT programme to participants, and practicality for clinicians. Data will be analyzed with linear mixed models for each outcome measure. Ethics and dissemination: The Human Research Ethics Committee of St Vincent's Hospital Australia have given ethics approval (HREC/13/SVH/291). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publication and social media channels of Australian Diabetes Consumer Representative Bodies. Trial registration number: The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613001198718).
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/033/CN-01128033/frame.html

Record #15 of 24
ID: CN-01159895
AU: Cullington H
AU: Kitterick P
AU: Debold L
AU: Weal M
AU: Clarke N
AU: Newberry E
AU: Aubert L
TI: Personalised long-term follow-up of cochlear implant patients using remote care, compared with those on the standard care pathway: Study protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial.
SO: BMJ Open
YR: 2016
VL: 6
NO: 5) (no pagination
XR: EMBASE 20160404170
PT: Journal: Article
KY: adult; article; change management; clinical pathway; *cochlea prosthesis; *cochlear implantation; controlled study; experience; *follow up; hearing; *hearing impairment/dm [Disease Management]; *hearing impairment/su [Surgery]; *hearing impairment/th [Therapy]; home care; human; online system; patient participation; *personalized medicine; *postoperative care; quality of life; randomized controlled trial; self evaluation; self monitoring; speech discrimination; staff; study design; *telemedicine; United Kingdom
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011342
AB: Introduction: Many resources are required to provide postoperative care to patients who receive a cochlear implant. The implant service commits to lifetime follow-up. The patient commits to regular adjustment and rehabilitation appointments in the first year and annual follow-up appointments thereafter. Offering remote follow-up may result in more stable hearing, reduced patient travel expense, time and disruption, more empowered patients, greater equality in service delivery and more freedom to optimise the allocation of clinic resources. Methods and analysis: This will be a two-arm feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) involving 60 adults using cochlear implants with at least 6 months device experience in a 6-month clinical trial of remote care. This project will design, implement and evaluate a person-centred long-term follow-up pathway for people using cochlear implants offering a triple approach of remote and self-monitoring, self-adjustment of device and a personalised online support tool for home speech recognition testing, information, self-rehabilitation, advice, equipment training and troubleshooting. The main outcome measure is patient activation. Secondary outcomes are stability and quality of hearing, stability of quality of life, clinic resources, patient and clinician experience, and any adverse events associated with remote care. We will examine the acceptability of remote care to service users and clinicians, the willingness of participants to be randomised, and attrition rates. We will estimate numbers required to plan a fully powered RCT. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval was received from North West - Greater Manchester South Research Ethics Committee (15/NW/0860) and the University of Southampton Research Governance Office (ERGO 15329). Results: Results will be disseminated in the clinical and scientific communities and also to the patient population via peer-reviewed research publications both online and in print, conference and meeting presentations, posters, newsletter articles, website reports and social media. Trial registration number: ISRCTN14644286; Pre-results.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/895/CN-01159895/frame.html

Record #16 of 24
ID: CN-01158287
AU: Cullington H
AU: Kitterick P
AU: Debold L
AU: Weal M
AU: Clarke N
AU: Newberry E
AU: Aubert L
TI: Personalised long-term follow-up of cochlear implant patients using remote care, compared with those on the standard care pathway: Study protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial.
SO: BMJ Open
YR: 2016
VL: 6
NO: 5) (no pagination
XR: EMBASE 20160404170
PT: Journal: Article
KY: adult; article; change management; clinical pathway; *cochlea prosthesis; *cochlear implantation; controlled study; experience; *follow up; hearing; *hearing impairment/dm [Disease Management]; *hearing impairment/su [Surgery]; *hearing impairment/th [Therapy]; home care; human; online system; patient participation; *personalized medicine; *postoperative care; quality of life; randomized controlled trial; self evaluation; self monitoring; speech discrimination; staff; study design; *telemedicine; United Kingdom
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011342
AB: Introduction: Many resources are required to provide postoperative care to patients who receive a cochlear implant. The implant service commits to lifetime follow-up. The patient commits to regular adjustment and rehabilitation appointments in the first year and annual follow-up appointments thereafter. Offering remote follow-up may result in more stable hearing, reduced patient travel expense, time and disruption, more empowered patients, greater equality in service delivery and more freedom to optimise the allocation of clinic resources. Methods and analysis: This will be a two-arm feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) involving 60 adults using cochlear implants with at least 6 months device experience in a 6-month clinical trial of remote care. This project will design, implement and evaluate a person-centred long-term follow-up pathway for people using cochlear implants offering a triple approach of remote and self-monitoring, self-adjustment of device and a personalised online support tool for home speech recognition testing, information, self-rehabilitation, advice, equipment training and troubleshooting. The main outcome measure is patient activation. Secondary outcomes are stability and quality of hearing, stability of quality of life, clinic resources, patient and clinician experience, and any adverse events associated with remote care. We will examine the acceptability of remote care to service users and clinicians, the willingness of participants to be randomised, and attrition rates. We will estimate numbers required to plan a fully powered RCT. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval was received from North West - Greater Manchester South Research Ethics Committee (15/NW/0860) and the University of Southampton Research Governance Office (ERGO 15329). Results: Results will be disseminated in the clinical and scientific communities and also to the patient population via peer-reviewed research publications both online and in print, conference and meeting presentations, posters, newsletter articles, website reports and social media. Trial registration number: ISRCTN14644286; Pre-results.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/287/CN-01158287/frame.html

Record #17 of 24
ID: CN-01051989
AU: Bailey JV
AU: Webster R
AU: Hunter R
AU: Freemantle N
AU: Rait G
AU: Michie S
AU: Estcourt C
AU: Anderson J
AU: Gerressu M
AU: Stephenson J
AU: Ang CS
AU: Hart G
AU: Dhanjal S
AU: Murray E
TI: The Men's Safer Sex (MeNSS) trial: Protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of an interactive digital intervention to increase condom use in men.
SO: BMJ Open
YR: 2015
VL: 5
NO: 2 // (NIHR) *National Institute for Health Research*
XR: EMBASE 2015787435
PT: Journal: Article
KY: adolescent; adult; aged; article; Chlamydia; clinical effectiveness; *condom use; contraceptive behavior; controlled study; cost effectiveness analysis; gonorrhea; human; *Internet; male; online system; pregnancy; quality of life; questionnaire; randomized controlled trial; self report; sexual health; sexually transmitted disease; unprotected sex
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007552
AB: Introduction: Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are a major public health problem. Condoms provide effective protection but there are many barriers to use. Face-to-face health promotion interventions are resource-intensive and show mixed results. Interactive digital interventions may provide a suitable alternative, allowing private access to personally tailored behaviour change support. We have developed an interactive digital intervention (the Men's Safer Sex (MenSS) website) which aims to increase condom use in men. We describe the protocol for a pilot trial to assess the feasibility of a full-scale randomised controlled trial of the MenSS website in addition to usual sexual health clinical care. Methods and analysis: Participants: Men aged 16 or over who report female sexual partners and recent unprotected sex or suspected acute STI. Participants (N=166) will be enrolled using a tablet computer in clinic waiting rooms. All trial procedures will be online, that is, eligibility checks; study consent; trial registration; automated random allocation; and data submission. At baseline and at 3, 6 and 12 months, an online questionnaire will assess condom use, selfreported STI diagnoses, and mediators of condom use (eg, knowledge, intention). Reminders will be by email and mobile phone. The primary outcome is condom use, measured at 3 months. STI rates will be recorded from sexual health clinic medical records at 12 months. The feasibility of a cost-effectiveness analysis will be assessed, to calculate incremental cost per STI prevented (Chlamydia or Gonorrhoea), from the NHS perspective. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval: City and East NHS Research Ethics Committee (reference number 13 LO 1801). Findings will be made available through publication in peer-reviewed journals, and to participants and members of the public via Twitter and from the University College London eHealth Unit website. Raw data will be made available on request.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/989/CN-01051989/frame.html

Record #18 of 24
ID: CN-00888492
AU: Frisardi V
AU: Imbimbo BP
TI: Gerontechnology for demented patients: Smart homes for smart aging.
SO: Journal of Alzheimer's disease
YR: 2011
VL: 23
NO: 1
PG: 143-6
XR: EMBASE 2011029216
PT: Journal: Review
KY: aging // caregiver burden // daily life activity // *dementia // *geriatric care // *home for the aged // human // priority journal // quality of life // randomized controlled trial // residential care // review // social network
DOI: 10.3233/JAD-2010-101599
AB: In an aging world, maintaining good health and independence for as long as possible is essential. Instead of hospitalization or institutionalization, the elderly with chronic conditions, especially those with cognitive impairment, can be assisted in their own environment with numerous 'smart' devices that support them in their activity of daily living. A "smart home" is a residence equipped with technology that facilitates monitoring of residents to improve quality of life and promote physical independence, as well as to reduce caregiver burden. Several projects worldwide have been conducted, but some ethical and legal issues are still unresolved and, at present, there is no evidence of the effects of smart homes on health outcomes. Randomized controlled trials are needed to understand the plus and minuses of these projects, but this will only be possible with a widespread proliferation and penetration of smart homes in the social network. 2011 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/492/CN-00888492/frame.html

Record #19 of 24
ID: CN-01118488
AU: Asscher JJ
AU: Dijkstra S
AU: Stams GJ
AU: Deković M
AU: Creemers HE
TI: Family group conferencing in youth care: characteristics of the decision making model, implementation and effectiveness of the Family Group (FG) plans.
SO: BMC public health
YR: 2014
VL: 14
PG: 154
PM: PUBMED 24517167
PT: Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
KY: Adolescent;Child Welfare;Cost-Benefit Analysis;Decision Support Techniques;Family;Group Processes;Mental Disorders [economics] [therapy];Netherlands;Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic;Research Design;Adult[checkword];Child[checkword];Female[checkword];Humans[checkword];Male[checkword]
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-154
AB: BACKGROUND: The model of Family group-conferencing (FG-c) for decision making in child welfare has rapidly spread over the world during the past decades. Its popularity is likely to be caused by its philosophy, emphasizing participation and autonomy of families, rather than based on positive research outcomes. Conclusive evidence regarding the (cost) effectiveness of FG-c is not yet available. The aim of this protocol is to describe the design of a study to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of FG-c as compared to Treatment as Usual. METHOD/DESIGN: The effectiveness of FG-c will be examined by means of a Randomized Controlled Trial. A multi-informant approach will be used to assess child safety as the primary outcome, and commitment of the social network, perceived control/ empowerment; family functioning and use of professional care as secondary outcomes. Implementation of FG-c, characteristics of family manager and family will be examined as moderators of effectiveness. DISCUSSION: Studying the effectiveness of Fg-c is crucial now the method is being implemented all over the world as a decision making model in child and youth care. Policy makers should be informed whether the ideals of participation in society and the right for self-determination indeed result in more effective care plans, and the money spent on FG-c is warranted. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register number NTR4320. The design of this study is approved by the independent Ethical Committee of the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences of The University of Amsterdam (approval number: 2013-POWL-3308). This study is financially supported by a grant from ZonMw, The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, grant number: 70-72900-98-13158.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/488/CN-01118488/frame.html

Record #20 of 24
ID: CN-01110524
AU: Bailey JV
AU: Webster R
AU: Hunter R
AU: Freemantle N
AU: Rait G
AU: Michie S
AU: Estcourt C
AU: Anderson J
AU: Gerressu M
AU: Stephenson J
AU: Ang CS
AU: Hart G
AU: Dhanjal S
AU: Murray E
TI: The Men's Safer Sex (MenSS) trial: protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of an interactive digital intervention to increase condom use in men.
SO: BMJ open
YR: 2015
VL: 5
NO: 2
PG: e007552
PM: PUBMED 25687900
PT: Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
KY: Adolescent;Cell Phones;Computers;Condoms [utilization];Electronic Mail;Health Promotion [methods];Men;Pilot Projects;Research Design;Safe Sex;Sexually Transmitted Diseases [prevention & control];Surveys and Questionnaires;Adult[checkword];Female[checkword];Humans[checkword];Male[checkword]
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007552
AB: INTRODUCTION: Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are a major public health problem. Condoms provide effective protection but there are many barriers to use. Face-to-face health promotion interventions are resource-intensive and show mixed results. Interactive digital interventions may provide a suitable alternative, allowing private access to personally tailored behaviour change support. We have developed an interactive digital intervention (the Men's Safer Sex (MenSS) website) which aims to increase condom use in men. We describe the protocol for a pilot trial to assess the feasibility of a full-scale randomised controlled trial of the MenSS website in addition to usual sexual health clinical care.METHODS AND ANALYSIS:PARTICIPANTS: Men aged 16 or over who report female sexual partners and recent unprotected sex or suspected acute STI. PARTICIPANTS (N=166) will be enrolled using a tablet computer in clinic waiting rooms. All trial procedures will be online, that is, eligibility checks; study consent; trial registration; automated random allocation; and data submission. At baseline and at 3, 6 and 12 months, an online questionnaire will assess condom use, self-reported STI diagnoses, and mediators of condom use (eg, knowledge, intention). Reminders will be by email and mobile phone. The primary outcome is condom use, measured at 3 months. STI rates will be recorded from sexual health clinic medical records at 12 months. The feasibility of a cost-effectiveness analysis will be assessed, to calculate incremental cost per STI prevented (Chlamydia or Gonorrhoea), from the NHS perspective.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval: City and East NHS Research Ethics Committee (reference number 13 LO 1801). Findings will be made available through publication in peer-reviewed journals, and to participants and members of the public via Twitter and from the University College London eHealth Unit website. Raw data will be made available on request.TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Current Controlled Trials. ISRCTN18649610. Registered 15 October 2013 http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN18649610.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/524/CN-01110524/frame.html

Record #21 of 24
ID: CN-01005093
AU: Inagaki M
AU: Yamada M
AU: Yonemoto N
AU: Takahashi K
TI: NOCOMIT-J: A community intervention trial of multi-modal suicide prevention program in Japan.
SO: European psychiatry
YR: 2012
VL: 27
XR: EMBASE 70794858
PT: Journal: Conference Abstract
KY: *intervention study; *suicide; *prevention; *Japan; *psychiatry; *community; human; population; social support; screening; counseling; aftercare; public health; randomized controlled trial; primary prevention; health promotion; personnel; secondary prevention; mental health; hope; risk; mental disease; professional standard; Japanese; health care
DOI: 10.1016/S0924-9338%2812%2975590-6
AB: Objective: The primary goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a community-based multimodal intervention program for suicide prevention in regions where the suicide rate was relatively high compared to control regions. The secondary goal was to explore the effectiveness of a community-based multimodal intervention program for suicide prevention in highly populated regions. Methods/design: NOCOMIT-J is a community-based large-scale non-randomized controlled trial, involving seven intervention regions with accompanying control regions, all with populations of statistically sufficient size. The program consists of 1) establishing social support networks in the public health system for suicide prevention and mental health promotion; 2) a primary prevention measures of awareness campaign for the public and key personnel; 3) secondary prevention measures for screening, counseling and outreach services for high-risk individuals; 4) after-care for individuals bereaved by suicide; 5) suicide prevention measures especially for individuals with mental illness and work-related problems. This study protocol was reviewed and approved by the Central Ethics Committee of the J-MISP. Additionally, the regional leaders obtained written authorization from the local governors. Results/progress: The intervention started in July 2006, and continued for 3.5 years. Participants are Japanese and foreign residents living in the intervention and control regions, a total of population of 2,120,000 individuals. Discussion: Because treatment and prevention of suicide are complex and encompass many factors, success will need multi-sector collaboration. We hope that the results of NOCOMIT-J will help to develop effective strategies to reduce future suicide rate.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/093/CN-01005093/frame.html

Record #22 of 24
ID: CN-01100013
AU: Contreras-Porta J
AU: Ruiz-Baques A
AU: Capel F
AU: Arino M
AU: Zorrozua A
TI: Development of a food allergy educative program: In-person vs online.
SO: Clinical and Translational Allergy. Conference: Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Meeting, FAAM 2013 Nice France.. Conference Publication: (var.pagings)
YR: 2013
VL: 3
PG: 121DUMMY
XR: EMBASE 71840328
PT: Journal: Conference Abstract
KY: *food allergy; *human; *anaphylaxis; patient; child; health practitioner; allergic reaction; allergy; satisfaction; risk; self care; learning; organization; professional standard; workshop; health care; scientist; model; social media; university hospital; quality of life; city; health education; questionnaire; videorecording; storytelling; parent; education program; Spain; death; allergen
AB: Background: Anaphylaxis is a rapid onset serious allergic reaction that may cause death. Food allergy is the most frequent cause of anaphylactic reactions and it is estimated to affect 7% of children in Spain. However, there is a lack of educational programsfor families in this condition.The growing use of social media and Participatory Medicine (PM) is allowing patients to take greater control of their own healthcare. The aim was to create an educational program that includes resources forin-person workshops and an online self-care education program for parents of children aged <12 years old who are at high risk of anaphylaxis due tofood allergy. Methods: This project has been conceived, developed and carried out under the PM model. Everything has been agreed upon by the principal Spanish patient associations on food allergy (AEPNAA, Immunitas Vera and Elikalte), and by health professionals and researchers. It received the approval of the Ethics Committee of the University Hospital La Paz, Madrid, and of the main scientific Spanish allergy societies SEAIC, SEICAP and AEP. Recruitment of participants was carried out via patient associations and the website http://www.alergiayalimentos.com. Those who accepted were randomly assigned to either an in-person or online educative program. Of a total of 300 participant families, 150 are attending in-person educational programs carried out in eight Spanish cities and led by health professionals and expert patients; the other 150 families are following the e-Learning platform. The project started in November 2012. Satisfaction levels and increases in knowledge are being assessed through an adhoc questionnaire administered before and after the educational program. Results: As of today, 300 families with children at high risk of anaphylaxis due to food allergy have agreed to participate. Participating families' satisfaction levels, as well as the degree of knowledge before and after the educational program, will be assessed and compared in both groups (in-person and online). Several media types were created, including educational videos, games, storytelling in order to improve knowledge of food allergy, how to avoid allergens, treat allergic reactions and how to use theEpinephrine Auto-Injector. Conclusion: CESA project has been well accepted by families of children with severe food allergies and is likely to show the need for health education in order to support proper management of the condition, thereby achieving a higher quality of life.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/013/CN-01100013/frame.html

Record #23 of 24
ID: CN-01008952
AU: Brosseau L
AU: Wells G
AU: Brooks S
AU: Bell M
AU: Angelis G
AU: Loew L
TI: The knowledge-to-action cycle (KTAC): A Canadian model to guide the dissemination and the implementation of the bilingual people getting a grip on arthritis self-management program.
SO: Journal of rheumatology
YR: 2014
VL: 41
NO: 7
PG: 1520
XR: EMBASE 71621437
PT: Journal: Conference Abstract
KY: *human; *arthritis; *self care; *rheumatology; *model; learning; self concept; rheumatoid arthritis; osteoarthritis; Tai Chi; randomized controlled trial; follow up; walking; kinesiotherapy; ethics; technology; control group; social media
DOI: 10.3899/jrheum.140420
AB: Objective: What are the best multifaceted strategies to implement the Ottawa Panel guidelines using the Canadian Implementation Model called the Knowledge-To-Action Cycle? Design: Between 2006 and 2012, four implementation studies including randomised controlled trials were conducted to facilitate the adoption of self-management interventions to rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Methods: Over 200 arthritic individuals participated to examine the efficacy/feasibility of various implementation strategies to facilitate the adoption of effective self-management interventions including walking programs, Tai Chi, therapeutic exercises etc. Ethics approval was obtained for all trials. Interventions: The intervention group used affordable technologies like social media for three months. The control group received unsupervised assistance to use the effective self-management programs. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was adherence to the self-management programs. Secondary outcomes were knowledge acquisition and self-efficacy. Measures were taken before and after program training and after three months. Results: After 3 months, participants were more compliant in the intervention group compared to the self-directed group (p< 0.012). Knowledge acquisition scores improved among participants with a mean difference of 1.8 (p < 0.01) when compared from baseline to immediate post-intervention. Self-efficacy towards self-management interventions was maintained from immediate post-intervention to three months follow-up, and confidence improved as the study progressed. Conclusion: The strategies used in the two studies were effective in improving program adherence, knowledge acquisition, and self-efficacy months later. The Knowledge- To-Action Cycle provided milestones to conduct these implementation studies.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/952/CN-01008952/frame.html

Record #24 of 24
ID: CN-01169565
AU: Vandelanotte C
AU: Short C
AU: Plotnikoff RC
AU: Hooker C
AU: Canoy D
AU: Rebar A
AU: Alley S
AU: Schoeppe S
AU: Mummery WK
AU: Duncan MJ
TI: TaylorActive--Examining the effectiveness of web-based personally-tailored videos to increase physical activity: a randomised controlled trial protocol.
SO: BMC public health
YR: 2015
VL: 15
PG: 1020
PM: PUBMED 26438225
PT: Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
KY: Attitude to Health;Australia;Exercise;Health Promotion [methods];Internet;Motivation;Program Evaluation [statistics & numerical data];Quality of Life;Social Support;Video Recording;Female[checkword];Humans[checkword];Male[checkword]
DOI: 10.1186/s12889-015-2363-4
AB: BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity levels are unacceptably high and effective interventions that can increase physical activity in large populations at low cost are urgently needed. Web-based interventions that use computer-tailoring have shown to be effective, though people tend to 'skim' and 'scan' text on the Internet rather than thoroughly read it. The use of online videos is, however, popular and engaging. Therefore, the aim of this 3-group randomised controlled trial is to examine whether a web-based physical activity intervention that provides personally-tailored videos is more effective when compared with traditional personally-tailored text-based intervention and a control group.METHODS/DESIGN: In total 510 Australians will be recruited through social media advertisements, e-mail and third party databases. Participants will be randomised to one of three groups: text-tailored, video-tailored, or control. All groups will gain access to the same web-based platform and a library containing brief physical activity articles. The text-tailored group will additionally have access to 8 sessions of personalised physical activity advice that is instantaneously generated based on responses to brief online surveys. The theory-based advice will be provided over a period of 3 months and address constructs such as self-efficacy, motivation, goal setting, intentions, social support, attitudes, barriers, outcome expectancies, relapse prevention and feedback on performance. Text-tailored participants will also be able to complete 7 action plans to help them plan what, when, where, who with, and how they will become more active. Participants in the video-tailored group will gain access to the same intervention content as those in the text-tailored group, however all sessions will be provided as personalised videos rather than text on a webpage. The control group will only gain access to the library with generic physical activity articles. The primary outcome is objectively measured physical activity. Secondary outcomes include website engagement and retention, quality of life, depression, anxiety, stress, sitting time, sleep and psychosocial correlates of physical activity. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 3, and 9 months.DISCUSSION: This study presents an ideal opportunity to study the effectiveness of an isolated feature within a web-based physical activity intervention and the knowledge generated from this study will help to increase intervention effectiveness.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New-Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12615000057583 . Registered 22 January 2015. CQUniversity Ethics Project Number: H14/07-163.
US: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/565/CN-01169565/frame.html

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