Work Description

Title: Substance use disorder education in medical schools: A scoping review of the literature [Literature Search Files] Open Access Deposited

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Attribute Value
Methodology
  • The data in this work originate from the literature searches of several citation databases, including MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Elsevier), ERIC (FirstSearch), and Web of Science (Clarivate).
Description
  • The dataset includes all citations considered for inclusion in the scoping review. The citations are accessible in Endnote (enlx) and Microsoft Excel (xlsx), as well as the primary citation export files from each database. The literature search strategies are included for reproducibility and transparency purposes. See the published methods for more information.
Creator
Depositor
  • markmac@umich.edu
Contact information
Discipline
Keyword
Citations to related material
  • Muzyk A, Smothers ZPW, Akrobetu D, Ruiz Veve J, MacEachern M, Tetrault JM, Grupen L. (2019). Substance use disorder education in medical schools: A scoping review of the literature. Academic Medicine. PMID: 31348067.
  • https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000002883
Resource type
Last modified
  • 04/27/2020
Published
  • 10/25/2019
Language
DOI
  • https://doi.org/10.7302/1yqh-yt41
License
To Cite this Work:
Muzyk, A., Smothers, Z., Akrobetu, D., Ruiz Veve, J., MacEachern, M., Tetrault, J., Gruppen, L. (2019). Substance use disorder education in medical schools: A scoping review of the literature [Literature Search Files] [Data set]. University of Michigan - Deep Blue. https://doi.org/10.7302/1yqh-yt41

Relationships

Files (Count: 12; Size: 24.3 MB)

Database: ERIC
Treatment for Addiction: Advancing the Common Good. Recommendations from a Join Together Policy Panel on Treatment and Recovery.

Join Together, Boston, MA.
1998 English Document (ED) 43 Join Together, 441 Stuart Street, 7th Floor, Boston, MA 02116; Tel: 617-437-1500; Fax: 617-437-9394; e-mail: info@jointogether.org; Web site: www.jointogether.org ($5).

Join Together convened a panel of experts to review U.S. policies for addiction treatment and recovery. Although the panel reached an agreement on six recommendations for policy changes that can make
help more accessible and expand treatment to more people. These recommendations are: (1) treatment for alcoholism and other drug addiction must be covered as a health benefit on an equal basis with
treatment for other diseases; (2) limited access to treatment for alcoholism and drug addiction is a national crisis that calls for a broad-based national campaign to educate the public and build
political support; (3) research on the nature and treatment of addiction and recovery should be expanded and the results made accessible to professionals, policymakers, and the public; (4) education
and training on addiction and recovery should be required for all health, mental health, social service, and justice system professionals; (5) treatment for alcoholism and drug addiction must be
monitored by independent treatment managers with no vested financial interests in order to ensure ongoing treatment effectiveness; and (6) diagnosis, treatment, and long-term recovery must be
integrated into a coordinated community-wide strategy to reduce alcohol and other drug problems....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED427109
Title: Treatment for Addiction: Advancing the Common Good. Recommendations from a Join Together Policy Panel on Treatment and Recovery.
Access ERIC: FullText
Corp Author(s): Join Together, Boston, MA.
Publication: Join Together, 441 Stuart Street, 7th Floor, Boston, MA 02116; Tel: 617-437-1500; Fax: 617-437-9394; e-mail: info@jointogether.org; Web site: www.jointogether.org ($5).; 1998-00-00
Description: 43 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Join Together convened a panel of experts to review U.S. policies for addiction treatment and recovery. Although the panel reached an agreement on six recommendations for policy
changes that can make help more accessible and expand treatment to more people. These recommendations are: (1) treatment for alcoholism and other drug addiction must be covered as a health benefit on
an equal basis with treatment for other diseases; (2) limited access to treatment for alcoholism and drug addiction is a national crisis that calls for a broad-based national campaign to educate the
public and build political support; (3) research on the nature and treatment of addiction and recovery should be expanded and the results made accessible to professionals, policymakers, and the
public; (4) education and training on addiction and recovery should be required for all health, mental health, social service, and justice system professionals; (5) treatment for alcoholism and drug
addiction must be monitored by independent treatment managers with no vested financial interests in order to ensure ongoing treatment effectiveness; and (6) diagnosis, treatment, and long-term
recovery must be integrated into a coordinated community-wide strategy to reduce alcohol and other drug problems. One appendix contains a glossary of treatment terms, and the other is a statement
from the Physician's Leadership on National Drug Policy. Forty-five treatment resource organizations are listed. (SLD)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Community Programs
Delivery Systems
Health Education
Health Insurance
Integrated Activities
Law Enforcement
Policy Formation
Public Policy
Substance Abuse
Therapy
Identifier: Addictive Behavior
Note(s): Audience: Community; Associated Inst: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Date of Entry: 1999
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How Community Efforts To Reduce Substance Abuse Have Influenced Race Relations. Lessons Learned Conferences Seminar Report (Cleveland, Ohio, March 30-31, 1998).

Benjamin P Bowser; K Deborah Whittle
1998 English Document (ED) 14 Join Together, 441 Stuart Street, Seventh Floor, Boston, MA 02116; Tel: 617-437-1500; Fax: 617-437-9394; Web site: www.jointogether.org; e-mail: info@jointogether.org

A series of meetings with leaders from six communities explored how efforts to reduce substance abuse may be affecting race relations. Leaders from these communities, located in Los Angeles
(California), Mobile (Alabama), Gallup (New Mexico), Kansas City (Missouri), San Francisco (California), and Vallejo (California), spoke about discord between racial groups and the tensions of
cultural and ethnic diversity....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED426163
Title: How Community Efforts To Reduce Substance Abuse Have Influenced Race Relations. Lessons Learned Conferences Seminar Report (Cleveland, Ohio, March 30-31, 1998).
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Bowser, Benjamin P. ; Whittle, K. Deborah
Corp Author(s): Join Together, Boston, MA.
Publication: Join Together, 441 Stuart Street, Seventh Floor, Boston, MA 02116; Tel: 617-437-1500; Fax: 617-437-9394; Web site: www.jointogether.org; e-mail: info@jointogether.org; 1998-00-00
Description: 14 p.
Language: English
Abstract: A series of meetings with leaders from six communities explored how efforts to reduce substance abuse may be affecting race relations. Leaders from these communities, located in
Los Angeles (California), Mobile (Alabama), Gallup (New Mexico), Kansas City (Missouri), San Francisco (California), and Vallejo (California), spoke about discord between racial groups and the
tensions of cultural and ethnic diversity. The participants arrived at a consensus that local race relations had improved as a consequence of working together to reduce substance abuse. Common themes
were identified from the various experiences of these communities: (1) a common cause can bring diverse groups together; (2) it is important to understand and acknowledge diversity within racial
groups; (3) it is important to involve community residents and institutional leaders as participants of equal status; and (4) local governments can be instrumental in facilitating constructive
community efforts. Brief profiles provide more specific information about the substance abuse efforts in each of the communities. Critical questions to be considered in implementing substance abuse
programs with implications for race relations are posed. (SLD)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Cooperation
Cultural Differences
Ethnicity
Program Descriptions
Racial Differences
Urban Problems
Urban Youth
(Major): Community Action
Prevention
Racial Relations
Substance Abuse
Note(s): Associated Inst: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1999; RIEMAY1999
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How Effects To Fight Substance Abuse Have Strengthened Civic Infrastructure. Lessons Learned Conferences Seminar Report (Washington, D.C., September 29-30, 1997).

Steven Rathgeb Smith
1998 English Document (ED) 14 Join Together, 441 Stuart Street, Seventh Floor, Boston, MA 02116; Tel: 617-437-1500; Fax: 617-437-9394; Web site: www.jointogether.org; e-mail: info@jointogether.org

A conference in Washington, D.C., brought together leaders from six communities to share their strategies to mobilize residents to fight substance abuse problems. The actions taken by community
groups and leaders in the following cities are described: Portland (Oregon); Hampton (Virginia); Baltimore (Maryland); New Haven (Connecticut); Newark (New Jersey); and Kansas City (Missouri)....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED426161
Title: How Effects To Fight Substance Abuse Have Strengthened Civic Infrastructure. Lessons Learned Conferences Seminar Report (Washington, D.C., September 29-30, 1997).
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Smith, Steven Rathgeb
Corp Author(s): Join Together, Boston, MA.
Publication: Join Together, 441 Stuart Street, Seventh Floor, Boston, MA 02116; Tel: 617-437-1500; Fax: 617-437-9394; Web site: www.jointogether.org; e-mail: info@jointogether.org; 1998-00-00
Description: 14 p.
Language: English
Abstract: A conference in Washington, D.C., brought together leaders from six communities to share their strategies to mobilize residents to fight substance abuse problems. The actions
taken by community groups and leaders in the following cities are described: Portland (Oregon); Hampton (Virginia); Baltimore (Maryland); New Haven (Connecticut); Newark (New Jersey); and Kansas City
(Missouri). In each of these cities, strengthening the community's civic infrastructure to respond to pressing issues was an unintended but positive outcome of efforts to reduce alcohol and drug
abuse. The central strategy of these successful programs has been creating new social and professional networks to reduce substance abuse and crime in their communities. The following lessons can be
drawn from the communities' experiences: (1) strategy matters, and a sound strategy is required to guide community efforts; (2) leadership is key to building and sustaining a healthy civic
infrastructure; (3) public-private partnerships must exist; and (4) community accountability is crucial. Profiles of the six partnerships provide additional information about their implementation and
operation. Suggestions are given for building civic infrastructure. (SLD)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Accountability
Conferences
Problem Solving
Program Descriptions
Program Effectiveness
Strategic Planning
Urban Areas
Urban Youth
(Major): Community Action
Networks
Prevention
Substance Abuse
Note(s): Associated Inst: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1999; RIEMAY1999
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Counseling in the U.S.-Mexico Border Region.

Todd T Russell; Julio F Madrigal
1998 English Document (ED) 23

Residents of the U. S.-Mexico border region have the immense task of reconciling two different and often incompatible cultures, traditions, and languages. The cultural and environmental conditions of
the South Texas border region are briefly described, and economic and social conditions are reviewed. The unique counseling needs of borderlanders of Mexican descent are identified and discussed....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED422552
Title: Counseling in the U.S.-Mexico Border Region.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Russell, Todd T. ; Madrigal, Julio F.
Publication: 1998-08-00
Description: 23 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Residents of the U. S.-Mexico border region have the immense task of reconciling two different and often incompatible cultures, traditions, and languages. The cultural and
environmental conditions of the South Texas border region are briefly described, and economic and social conditions are reviewed. The unique counseling needs of borderlanders of Mexican descent are
identified and discussed. In order to properly provide counseling services to "fronterizos," mental health professionals must be bilingual and must understand the socioeconomic factors of the area
and the social dynamics between the two nations. The counselor is confronted by challenges of counseling bilingual clients in two languages, differences of culture within each of the language or
national traditions, high rates of substance abuse, violence, and depression, and the not always smooth transformation of traditions from the past. Assets of the region include a strong emphasis on
family and personal relationships. Specific issues for school, college, mental health, and substance abuse counselors are highlighted; education opportunities and issues are reviewed. The counseling
professional "en la frontera" can facilitate the process of a client developing a strong bicultural identity that effectively weaves together the fabrics of the two cultures. (EMK)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Biculturalism
Bilingual Education
Code Switching (Language)
Counseling
Counselor Training
Cultural Context
Hispanic American Culture
Mental Health Workers
Mexican American Education
Mexican Americans
School Counseling
Substance Abuse
Identifier: Mexico United States Border
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom; Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1999
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Substance Abuse by Anesthesiology Residents.

Irving Lutsky
1991 English Article (EJ) Academic Medicine, v66 n3 p164-66 Mar 1991

The analysis of 183 responses to a survey of former anesthesiology residents of the Medical College of Wisconsin found that 29 had been self-administered problematic substance abusers during their
residencies, 23 had been alcohol dependent, and 6 had been drug dependent. More than 85 percent of respondents considered the drug policy information available during their residencies inadequate....

Availability: FirstSearch indicates your institution subscribes to this publication. Libraries worldwide that own item: 985 University of Michigan Library Search the Mirlyn catalog at the
University of MichiganLocal Holdings Information: 71-82; 1996-2007; 64-70; 1989-1995; 64-; 1989-
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ424780
Author(s): Lutsky, Irving ; And Others
Title: Substance Abuse by Anesthesiology Residents.
Source: Academic Medicine v66 n3 p164-66 Mar 1991
Standard No: ISSN: 1040-2446
Language: English
Abstract: The analysis of 183 responses to a survey of former anesthesiology residents of the Medical College of Wisconsin found that 29 had been self-administered problematic substance
abusers during their residencies, 23 had been alcohol dependent, and 6 had been drug dependent. More than 85 percent of respondents considered the drug policy information available during their
residencies inadequate. (Author/DB)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Abuse
Anesthesiology
Drug Abuse
Graduate Medical Students
Graduate Surveys
Higher Education
Incidence
Medical Education
Medical Schools
Substance Abuse
Identifier: Medical College of Wisconsin
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Date of Entry: 1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Drug Affected Babies: A Bibliography.

Portland Public Schools, OR. Dept. of Research, Evaluation, and Testing.
1990 English Document (ED) 10 Professional Library, Portland Public Schools, P.O. Box 3107, Portland, OR 97208 (503) 249-2000 x267.

This 42-item annotated bibliography, represents a comprehensive effort to gather information on the educational problems of infant children of substance-abusing parents. Extensive searches were
conducted in databases in the fields of education, medicine, social sciences, and the humanities. In particular, studies on the problems of "crack babies" are only beginning to appear in the
literature....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED333055
Title: Drug Affected Babies: A Bibliography.
Corp Author(s): Portland Public Schools, OR. Dept. of Research, Evaluation, and Testing.
Publication: Professional Library, Portland Public Schools, P.O. Box 3107, Portland, OR 97208 (503) 249-2000 x267.; 1990-08-00
Description: 10 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This 42-item annotated bibliography, represents a comprehensive effort to gather information on the educational problems of infant children of substance-abusing parents. Extensive
searches were conducted in databases in the fields of education, medicine, social sciences, and the humanities. In particular, studies on the problems of "crack babies" are only beginning to appear
in the literature. "Crack" is having an impact on the educational world that is almost beyond comprehension, and its duration and gravity are not yet fully known. Early studies examine the severity,
permanence, and nature of the problem. Of special note among the sources cited are the papers of the National Association for Perinatal Addiction Research and Education (NAPARE), which must be viewed
at the Portland School District professional library due to copyright restrictions or may be ordered from the publisher. Copies of all materials, except the NAPARE papers, are available from the
professional library and an order form is appended. (FMW)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Child Development
Child Health
Cocaine
Crack
Drug Addiction
Early Childhood Education
Heroin
Illegal Drug Use
Infants
Mothers
Neonates
Parent Child Relationship
Perinatal Influences
Special Health Problems
Urban Schools
Identifier: Crack Babies; Fetal Drug Exposure
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reference Materials - Bibliographies
Date of Entry: 1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Evaluating Faculty Development and Clinical Training Programs in Substance Abuse: A Guide Book.

Michael Klitzner; Kathryn Stewart
1990 English Document (ED) 33

Intended to provide an overview of program evaluation as it applies to the evaluation of faculty development and clinical training programs in substance abuse for health and mental health
professional schools, this guide enables program developers and other faculty to work as partners with evaluators in the development of evaluation designs that meet the specialized needs of faculty
development and clinical training programs....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED332636
Title: Evaluating Faculty Development and Clinical Training Programs in Substance Abuse: A Guide Book.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Klitzner, Michael ; Stewart, Kathryn
Corp Author(s): Pacific Inst. for Research and Evaluation, Walnut Creek, CA.
Publication: 1990-06-00
Description: 33 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Intended to provide an overview of program evaluation as it applies to the evaluation of faculty development and clinical training programs in substance abuse for health and
mental health professional schools, this guide enables program developers and other faculty to work as partners with evaluators in the development of evaluation designs that meet the specialized
needs of faculty development and clinical training programs. Section I discusses conceptual issues in program evaluation, including the uses of evaluation (management and monitoring, program
description, program improvement, accountability, and creating new knowledge); the major options (formative/summative, process/outcome/impact, quantitative/qualitative); and the benefits and risks of
conducting evaluation studies. Section II, an introduction to research methods, includes the following discussions: sampling with known sampling errors (simple random, systematic, multistage random,
stratified, cluster, stratified cluster, and sequential sampling); sampling without known sampling errors (convenience, quota, modal, purposive, and snowball sampling); sample size and
generalizability and sample size and statistical power; the validity of evaluations and potential sources of bias, including issues related to internal validity (history, maturation, testing,
instrumentation, statistical regression, selection, mortality, interactions with selection, and ambiguity about the direction of causal influence); comparison and control groups; measurement of
outcomes; and qualitative evaluation methods and analysis. (5 references) (JB)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Abuse
Allied Health Occupations Education
Drug Abuse
Graduate Medical Education
Higher Education
Medical Education
Medical School Faculty
Mental Health
Qualitative Research
Sampling
Statistical Bias
(Major): Clinical Teaching (Health Professions)
Evaluation Methods
Faculty Development
Program Evaluation
Research Methodology
Substance Abuse
Note(s): Report: RPO778; Associated Inst: National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.; National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom; Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1991; RIEOCT1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alcohol/Drug Abuse for East Carolina University Students, Faculty, and Staff.

East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC.
1990 English Document (ED) 14

This booklet for distribution to students and employees contains East Carolina University's (ECU/North Carolina) policy prohibiting illegal drug use, a description of the medical and legal
implications of using illegal substances, and a listing of campus and off-campus resources available to assist persons with substance abuse problems. A statement of ECU philosophy proceeds the policy
statement which includes sections on educational programs to prevent drug abuse, preventative counseling and rehabilitation programs, disciplinary actions, assignment of responsibilities under the
policy, and policy dissemination....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED332576
Title: Alcohol/Drug Abuse for East Carolina University Students, Faculty, and Staff.
Corp Author(s): East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC.
Publication: 1990-08-00
Description: 14 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This booklet for distribution to students and employees contains East Carolina University's (ECU/North Carolina) policy prohibiting illegal drug use, a description of the medical
and legal implications of using illegal substances, and a listing of campus and off-campus resources available to assist persons with substance abuse problems. A statement of ECU philosophy proceeds
the policy statement which includes sections on educational programs to prevent drug abuse, preventative counseling and rehabilitation programs, disciplinary actions, assignment of responsibilities
under the policy, and policy dissemination. There follows a chart indicating for each category of illicit drug and for alcoholic beverages the health risks, the legal penalties under North Carolina
law, and ECU disciplinary actions. Two more charts show the penalties for possession of drug paraphernalia, and for counterfeit controlled substances. Four final sections list various resources to
assist with substance abuse including drug and alcohol resources and clinical services (address, telephone, contact person and program description for each service); self help resources (e.g.,
listing of times and places of local Alcoholics Anonymous meetings); academic resources (classes on substance abuse and faculty resources); religious organizations (address, contact person, and
telephone number for each). (JB)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Abuse
Community Health Services
Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Higher Education
Policy Formation
Prevention
Religious Organizations
State Legislation
Identifier: Network for Drug Free Colleges; East Carolina University NC
Note(s): Audience: Students/ Practitioners/ Support Staff
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials; Guides - Non-Classroom
Date of Entry: 1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Evaluation of a Model Curriculum on Substance Abuse at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Ramana Gopalan
1992 English Article (EJ) Academic Medicine, v67 n4 p260-66 Apr 1992

A Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical college substance abuse education program was evaluated by nine annual student surveys (n=892 students). Significant improvements were found in student
attitudes, beliefs in role responsibility, and confidence in skills during preclinical years. Clinical programs emphasizing substance abuse increased and sustained gains....

Availability: FirstSearch indicates your institution subscribes to this publication. Libraries worldwide that own item: 985 University of Michigan Library Search the Mirlyn catalog at the
University of MichiganLocal Holdings Information: 71-82; 1996-2007; 64-70; 1989-1995; 64-; 1989-
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ444670
Author(s): Gopalan, Ramana ; And Others
Title: Evaluation of a Model Curriculum on Substance Abuse at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
Source: Academic Medicine v67 n4 p260-66 Apr 1992
Standard No: ISSN: 1040-2446
Language: English
Abstract: A Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical college substance abuse education program was evaluated by nine annual student surveys (n=892 students). Significant improvements
were found in student attitudes, beliefs in role responsibility, and confidence in skills during preclinical years. Clinical programs emphasizing substance abuse increased and sustained gains.
Instructional implications are discussed. (Author/MSE)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Clinical Experience
Curriculum Evaluation
Higher Education
Medical Education
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Professional Education
Program Effectiveness
Role Perception
School Surveys
Self Esteem
Student Attitudes
Student Responsibility
Substance Abuse
Identifier: Johns Hopkins University MD
Note(s): Target Audience: Teachers; Administrators; Practitioners
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Date of Entry: 1992
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pre-employment Drug Testing of Housestaff Physicians at a Large Urban Hospital.

Robert M Lewy
1991 English Article (EJ) Journal of Academic Medicine, v66 n10 p618-19 Oct 1991

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (New York City) program of preemployment urine toxicology examinations for beginning housestaff physicians has resulted in treatment for two physicians
testing positive for illegal drugs. The program's primary purpose is to focus on substance abuse issues in graduate medical education. (Author/MSE)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ434660
Author(s): Lewy, Robert M.
Title: Pre-employment Drug Testing of Housestaff Physicians at a Large Urban Hospital.
Source: Journal of Academic Medicine v66 n10 p618-19 Oct 1991
Language: English
Abstract: The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (New York City) program of preemployment urine toxicology examinations for beginning housestaff physicians has resulted in treatment for
two physicians testing positive for illegal drugs. The program's primary purpose is to focus on substance abuse issues in graduate medical education. (Author/MSE)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Drug Use Testing
Employment Qualifications
Graduate Medical Education
Graduate Medical Students
Higher Education
Physicians
Professional Education
Program Descriptions
Screening Tests
Teaching Hospitals
Urban Areas
Identifier: Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center NY
Note(s): Target Audience: Teachers; Administrators; Practitioners
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1992
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Substance Abuse Education for Health Professionals. Report on a European Symposium (The Hague, The Netherlands, October 9-11, 1989). EUR/HFA Target 17.

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.
1990 English Document (ED) 28

This report presents the results of a symposium attended by health representatives (nursing, social work, psychology) of eight European governments who met in accordance with target 17 of the World
Health Organization (WHO), "Decreasing health-damaging behaviour," to examine the reorientation of education (substance abuse) for health personnel to make it more relevant to health needs....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED344543
Title: Substance Abuse Education for Health Professionals. Report on a European Symposium (The Hague, The Netherlands, October 9-11, 1989). EUR/HFA Target 17.
Corp Author(s): World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.
Publication: 1990-00-00
Description: 28 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This report presents the results of a symposium attended by health representatives (nursing, social work, psychology) of eight European governments who met in accordance with
target 17 of the World Health Organization (WHO), "Decreasing health-damaging behaviour," to examine the reorientation of education (substance abuse) for health personnel to make it more relevant to
health needs. The report first describes the symposium's purpose, scope, and various sessions. Next, discussions are presented concerning current training availability of various groups of health
professionals regarding substance abuse, as well as what was found to exist in undergraduate medical student education, and within the medical specialties. This is followed by discussions of the
organization of training for the trainers of drug and alcohol abuse education programs, and the use of multiprofessional and multidisciplinary training. Finally, it is concluded that national
planning efforts are needed in the coordination of substance abuse training, that international cooperation should be maintained in the form of a European network of substance abuse training centers,
and bilateral or multilateral exchanges, and that an international catalogue of training resources should be developed and disseminated. The report concludes with several recommendations on the
objectives and technologies of substance abuse training for health professionals. Appendices contain a list of participants, working papers and background documents. In addition summaries of the
report provided in French, German, and Russian. (GLR)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Abuse
Drug Abuse
Educational Needs
Foreign Countries
Health Education
Higher Education
International Cooperation
Nurses
Professional Education
Professional Training
Psychologists
Social Workers
Substance Abuse
Training Methods
Identifier: Health for All by the Year 2000; Europe; World Health Organization
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Collected Works - Proceedings
Date of Entry: 1992
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Family Practice Physicians: Training Needs in Regards to Substance Abuse.

Michele J Eliason; Anne Helene Skinstad
2002 English Article (EJ) Journal of Teaching in the Addictions, v1 n2 p43-55 2002

Family medicine physicians were surveyed about their knowledge of substance abuse and wishes for continuing education. Results showed 10% had no substance abuse training in medical school, 15% had
none during residency, and 21% had no continuing education on substance abuse. Most preferred continuing education programs as part of an annual conference, and were unlikely to use distance learning
techniques....

Availability: FirstSearch indicates your institution subscribes to this publication. Libraries worldwide that own item: 278 University of Michigan Library Search the Mirlyn catalog at the
University of MichiganLocal Holdings Information: 2002-
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ669360
Author(s): Eliason, Michele J. ; Skinstad, Anne Helene
Title: Family Practice Physicians: Training Needs in Regards to Substance Abuse.
Source: Journal of Teaching in the Addictions v1 n2 p43-55 2002
Standard No: ISSN: 1533-2705
Language: English
Abstract: Family medicine physicians were surveyed about their knowledge of substance abuse and wishes for continuing education. Results showed 10% had no substance abuse training in
medical school, 15% had none during residency, and 21% had no continuing education on substance abuse. Most preferred continuing education programs as part of an annual conference, and were unlikely
to use distance learning techniques. (Contains 10 references and 2 tables.)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Educational Needs
Graduate Medical Students
Substance Abuse
(Major): Physicians
Professional Continuing Education
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Date of Entry: 2003; CIJNOV2003
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A Literature Review on Youth and Citizenship. CPRN Discussion Paper.

Caroline Beauvais; Lindsey McKay; Adam Seddon
2001 English Document (ED) 129 For full text: http://www.cprn.org/docs/corporate/rlryc_e.pdf.

Using the yardsticks of independence and equality, an analysis of the literature on youth from a citizenship perspective can track youth's citizenship status and capacity to become full citizens. For
young people, education is an avenue to either exclusion or independence and equality. For example, dropouts are more likely to live in poverty, and economic independence is considered key to
achieving full citizenship....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED475454
Title: A Literature Review on Youth and Citizenship. CPRN Discussion Paper.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Beauvais, Caroline ; McKay, Lindsey ; Seddon, Adam
Corp Author(s): Canadian Policy Research Networks Inc., Ottawa (Ontario).
Publication: For full text: http://www.cprn.org/docs/corporate/rlryc_e.pdf.; 2001-06-00
Description: 129 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Using the yardsticks of independence and equality, an analysis of the literature on youth from a citizenship perspective can track youth's citizenship status and capacity to
become full citizens. For young people, education is an avenue to either exclusion or independence and equality. For example, dropouts are more likely to live in poverty, and economic independence is
considered key to achieving full citizenship. Exclusion exists in the school system, as schools continue to stream young women into traditional career paths and allow racial discrimination. Schools
fail to provide the knowledge and capacity to make informed, intelligent choices about substance abuse and sexuality. Access to education, student debt, and labor market conditions delay economic
independence. Young people face discrimination due to age and membership in a particular community. Examples of differential treatment are found in the areas of work, medicine, social services, and
legal system. Their right to protection from harm is infringed upon most by the transportation system and societal problems related to gender, poverty, and marginalization. Having hope for the future
and feelings of belonging influence youth participation in politics and resistance to marginalization through formation of subcultures and via political protest. The notion of precariousness best
captures the experience of youth citizenship with respect to exercise of rights and responsibilities, access, and belonging. (Appendixes include a 271-item bibliography and roundtable summary.) (YLB)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Age Discrimination
Citizen Participation
Citizen Role
Citizenship
Citizenship Education
Citizenship Responsibility
Dropouts
Literature Reviews
Poverty
Racial Discrimination
Role of Education
School Effectiveness
Secondary Education
Sex Discrimination
Subcultures
Youth
Youth Opportunities
Youth Problems
Identifier: Canada; Personal Independence; Canada
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Date of Entry: 2003
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Effect of a Course on Students' Attitudes Toward Substance Abuse and Its Treatment.

John N Chappel; Tracy L Veach
1987 English Article (EJ) Journal of Medical Education, v62 n5 p394-400 May 1987

From 1978 through 1982, pretests and posttests of second-year medical students' attitudes toward substance abuse and its treatment showed that positive attitude change could be achieved during a
substance-abuse course. However, course scheduling in competition with demanding basic science course hampered development of positive attitudes. (MSE)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ354297
Author(s): Chappel, John N. ; Veach, Tracy L.
Title: Effect of a Course on Students' Attitudes Toward Substance Abuse and Its Treatment.
Source: Journal of Medical Education v62 n5 p394-400 May 1987
Language: English
Abstract: From 1978 through 1982, pretests and posttests of second-year medical students' attitudes toward substance abuse and its treatment showed that positive attitude change could be
achieved during a substance-abuse course. However, course scheduling in competition with demanding basic science course hampered development of positive attitudes. (MSE)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Drug Rehabilitation
Higher Education
Instructional Effectiveness
Medical Students
Professional Education
(Major): Drinking
Drug Abuse
Medical Education
Scheduling
Student Attitudes
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Date of Entry: 1987; CIJSEP1987
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CRACKDOWN: A Guide to Preventing Substance Abuse Elementary. Citywide Teach-in--September 30.

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.
1986 English Document (ED) 41 New York City Board of Education, Curriculum Editorial and Production Unit, Office of Curriculum Development and Support, Room 613, 131 Livingston St., Brooklyn, NY
11201 ($3.00). ; ISBN: ISBN-88315-813-2

This elementary school curriculum guide, the subject of a citywide teach-in in the New York City schools, provides facts, lessons, and learning activities designed to provide information about and to
prevent the use of crack, a form of cocaine. The lessons are divided into two groups, one for grades K-3 and the other grades 4-6. The primary curriculum consists of four interdisciplinary lessons:
(1) You Are What You Eat: How Foods Help Us; (2) Dangers in the House; (3) Dangers in Your Medicine Cabinet; and (4) Pinocchio Goes to Pleasure Island: A Story of Peer Pressure....

Availability: Search the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED281954
Title: CRACKDOWN: A Guide to Preventing Substance Abuse Elementary. Citywide Teach-in--September 30.
Corp Author(s): New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.
Publication: New York City Board of Education, Curriculum Editorial and Production Unit, Office of Curriculum Development and Support, Room 613, 131 Livingston St., Brooklyn, NY 11201
($3.00).; 1986-00-00
Description: 41 p.
Language: English
Standard No: ISBN: ISBN-88315-813-2
Abstract: This elementary school curriculum guide, the subject of a citywide teach-in in the New York City schools, provides facts, lessons, and learning activities designed to provide
information about and to prevent the use of crack, a form of cocaine. The lessons are divided into two groups, one for grades K-3 and the other grades 4-6. The primary curriculum consists of four
interdisciplinary lessons: (1) You Are What You Eat: How Foods Help Us; (2) Dangers in the House; (3) Dangers in Your Medicine Cabinet; and (4) Pinocchio Goes to Pleasure Island: A Story of Peer
Pressure. These lessons provide a framework for teaching about substance abuse if the children raise this problem. The lessons for grades 4-6 focus on the facts about crack, the reasons people give
for using crack, how to say no, and on deciding whether to use drugs: titles of lessons are (1) Pharmacology of Crack: What It Does to the Body; (2) Reasons Given for Drug Abuse; and (3) Consequences
of Using Crack. Follow-up activities for grades 4-6, a fact sheet for teachers, a poster, and an evaluation form are also included. (KH)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Elementary Education
Health
Illegal Drug Use
Instructional Materials
Primary Education
Science Education
Social Problems
Social Studies
Urban Schools
Identifier: Cocaine; Crack; New York (New York); New York (New York)
Note(s): Audience: Practitioners
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Date of Entry: 1987
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
American Indian Education and the Reservation Community College.

James H III Raymond
1986 English Document (ED) 21

On almost any socioeconomic indicator measuring achievement or material acquisition (e.g., educational attainment, life expectancy, or unemployment), the American Indian ranks lower than any ethnic
or racial group, other than those most recently immigrated. In an effort to overcome the shortcomings of reservation education and to exercise internal control of the educational process, in the
1960s, tribal leaders began providing facility space to area community colleges willing to deliver an Indian-centered curriculum....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED276489
Title: American Indian Education and the Reservation Community College.
Author(s): Raymond, James H., III
Publication: 1986-12-00
Description: 21 p.
Language: English
Abstract: On almost any socioeconomic indicator measuring achievement or material acquisition (e.g., educational attainment, life expectancy, or unemployment), the American Indian ranks
lower than any ethnic or racial group, other than those most recently immigrated. In an effort to overcome the shortcomings of reservation education and to exercise internal control of the
educational process, in the 1960s, tribal leaders began providing facility space to area community colleges willing to deliver an Indian-centered curriculum. While these endeavors proved to be
somewhat successful in establishing good working relationships, the range of Indian-related courses fell far short of tribal expectations. With federal and private aid, Indian-controlled and directed
community colleges were established on reservations to address the specific needs of the tribes. In 1972, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AINEC) was formed to provide training and
technical assistance to member colleges and to develop methodologies to deliver a curriculum that would satisfy special interests, provide remedial education, offer vocational skills training, and
develop lower division courses that would transfer to senior institutions. In answer to the greatest needs, the staples of the reservation community college curricula are in business management,
substance abuse services, and medical assistance. In addition, all of the community colleges offer studies in tribal history and language development. Some of the colleges have achieved articulation
and transfer agreements with four-year institutions as well. The two most pressing needs of the reservation communities are Indian-delivered education at all levels, and vocational/technical
paraprofessionals. While the latter can help to effect the development of the reservations, the former can prepare the communities for newly emerging realities. Community colleges can influence both
processes. (EJV)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: American Indians
Curriculum Development
Educational History
Two Year Colleges
(Major): American Indian Education
College Curriculum
College Role
Community Colleges
Note(s): Graduate Seminar Paper, University of Florida.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers
Date of Entry: 1987; RIEAPR1987
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salubridad Chicana: Su Preservacion Y Mantenimiento -- The Chicano Plan for Mental Health.

Ruben Ed Duran
1975 No language available Document (ED) 76

In devising the mental health plan for Chicanos, the social, economic, and political forces that adversely affect their emotional well-being must be considered. While defining mental health needs and
proposing ways to meet those needs, the cultural background of the Chicano people must seriously be considered. The plan should stress the importance of strong family ties and make provision to
maintain and strengthen them....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED121526
Title: Salubridad Chicana: Su Preservacion Y Mantenimiento -- The Chicano Plan for Mental Health.
Author(s): Duran, Ruben, Ed. ; And Others
Corp Author(s): Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. Mental Health Manpower Office.
Publication: 1975-03-15
Description: 76 p.
Language: No language available
Abstract: In devising the mental health plan for Chicanos, the social, economic, and political forces that adversely affect their emotional well-being must be considered. While defining
mental health needs and proposing ways to meet those needs, the cultural background of the Chicano people must seriously be considered. The plan should stress the importance of strong family ties and
make provision to maintain and strengthen them. The plan's principal thrust should be a mental health service system based on their cultural needs. This paper presents an overview of the social,
economic, and political factors that are detrimental to the emotional well-being of Chicanos. Topics include: la familia, the urban barrio, mental health needs of migrant workers, addiction to "hard
drugs" and alcoholism, education and the child, and legal recourse for procurement of mental health resources. Criteria for evaluating mental health delivery programs serving the Chicano communities
are given. Among these are: "Does the program preserve and understand the unique nature of the Chicano familia?"; "Is the indigenous Chicano community used as a source of manpower and expertise:";
"Have steps been taken to sensitize the staff to the unique values and life styles of the community residents?"; and "Has the program developed one or more service components designed to reach
Chicanos in their own environment?" (NQ)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcoholism
Delivery Systems
Drug Abuse
Evaluation Criteria
Family (Sociological Unit)
Health Needs
Mental Health Programs
Mexican Americans
Migrant Workers
Political Influences
Socioeconomic Influences
Urban Population
Identifier: Chicanos
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Books
Date of Entry: 1976
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Study of a Pilot Educational Program between Nassau Community College and Topic House (Nassau County Drug Addiction Rehabilitation Center). Report of Pilot Project.

Melvin Morgenstern; Harriet Strongin
1970 No language available Document (ED) 10

Effects were explored of a multifaceted program of higher and secondary education for former drug addicts at Topic House, Nassau County, New York. Community college courses, High School Equivalency
Diploma classes, vocational and technical training, and orientation for teachers and participating addicts, were among the activities offered. Of the 75 Topic House residents involved in the 1969-70
program, 44 are now (Fall 1970) working and attending Nassau Community College, 26 are working full time, one has married and two are back on drugs....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED048572
Title: Study of a Pilot Educational Program between Nassau Community College and Topic House (Nassau County Drug Addiction Rehabilitation Center). Report of Pilot Project.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Morgenstern, Melvin ; Strongin, Harriet
Publication: 1970-00-00
Description: 10 p.
Language: No language available
Abstract: Effects were explored of a multifaceted program of higher and secondary education for former drug addicts at Topic House, Nassau County, New York. Community college courses, High
School Equivalency Diploma classes, vocational and technical training, and orientation for teachers and participating addicts, were among the activities offered. Of the 75 Topic House residents
involved in the 1969-70 program, 44 are now (Fall 1970) working and attending Nassau Community College, 26 are working full time, one has married and two are back on drugs. Ten persons are studying
for equivalency diplomas. Fifteen have expressed interest in other vocational areas, and suitable training centers are being sought. Persistence in therapy, academic and work performance, and certain
other criteria seem to favor those who have participated in the pilot programs. Numerous recommendations in such areas as public relations, course planning, and professional training, were
formulated; and the Nassau County Drug Abuse and Addiction Commission has already taken steps to implement inhouse courses for Topic House patients and staff. (LY)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Adult Education
Community Colleges
Drug Addiction
Drug Rehabilitation
Enrollment
Higher Education
Patients
Pilot Projects
Prevocational Education
Program Evaluation
Secondary Education
Identifier: Topic House NY; Nassau Community College NY
Note(s): Associated Inst: New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational Education Research.; Nassau Community Coll., Garden City, NY.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Date of Entry: 1971
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Survey of Health Psychology Training among Counseling Psychology Programs.

Elizabeth M Altmaier
1984 English Document (ED) 22

Health psychology has emerged as a potentially distinct specialty within counseling psychology. To determine the nature and extent of health psychology training in counseling psychology programs, 55
training directors of counseling psychology programs that are either members of the Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs (CCPTP) or are approved, or being approved, by the American
Psychological Association were surveyed....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED250625
Title: Survey of Health Psychology Training among Counseling Psychology Programs.
Author(s): Altmaier, Elizabeth M.
Publication: 1984-08-00
Description: 22 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Health psychology has emerged as a potentially distinct specialty within counseling psychology. To determine the nature and extent of health psychology training in counseling
psychology programs, 55 training directors of counseling psychology programs that are either members of the Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs (CCPTP) or are approved, or being
approved, by the American Psychological Association were surveyed. The survey focused on identifying information about the program, course work in health psychology available either within or outside
the program, applied experiences, research interests, and placement. The results of the survey (response rate of 89%) showed that almost 60% of the programs had no health psychology course work.
Those programs offering relevant courses indicated courses focusing on substance abuse, disability, general health psychology, and rehabilitation. Fifty-nine percent of the programs reported
practicum placements in health psychology. An average of 1.5 faculty per program was reported to have health psychology as an interest area. Students reported a moderate interest in the subject area,
with 18% of them participating in related research. A moderate percentage (35-40%) of the programs reported no internships or job placements in health psychology related settings. These findings
suggest that there is a moderate interest in health psychology research and practice among counseling psychology faculty and students. (The survey questionnaire is attached.) (BL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: College Faculty
College Students
Counseling Services
Counselor Training
Higher Education
Practicums
Program Development
Identifier: Health Psychology
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Tests/Questionnaires
Date of Entry: 1985
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.

Michael R Ed Liepman
1984 English Document (ED) 355 Society for Teachers of Family Medicine, 1740 West 92nd Street, Kansas City, MO 64114.

This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for each area in all
chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and various drug interactions....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED248437
Title: Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.
Author(s): Liepman, Michael R., Ed. ; And Others
Corp Author(s): Society for Teachers of Family Medicine, Kansas City, MO.
Publication: Society for Teachers of Family Medicine, 1740 West 92nd Street, Kansas City, MO 64114.; 1984-00-00
Description: 355 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for
each area in all chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and various drug interactions. For each
substance, the chemistry, metabolism, psychoactive properties, body system effects, intoxication, and tolerance and dependence levels are discussed. Chapter 2 discusses the pathophysiology of ethanol
abuse. Chapter 3 deals with the identification of substance abusers, while chapter 4 addresses change motivation. Chapters 5 through 7 address detoxification, rehabilitation, and prevention. Chapters
8 and 9 address chemical dependency in the family and in the family physician, taking into consideration assessment, treatment, and education and counseling needs. The last chapter presents
strategies for curricular change in the university, the medical school, family medicine departments, and community training programs. References and materials citations are appended. (BL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Curriculum Development
Curriculum Guides
Family Problems
High Risk Persons
Higher Education
Pathology
(Major): Alcoholism
Drug Abuse
Drug Rehabilitation
Family Practice (Medicine)
Pharmacology
Prevention
Note(s): Developed and compiled by the Task Force on Substance Abuse. Dot matrix printing, some pages are marginally reproducible./ Contract No: HRP-0905868/ Audience:
Teachers/ Practitioners; Associated Inst: Health Resources Administration (DHHS/PHS), Hyattsville, MD. Div. of Medicine.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Date of Entry: 1985; RIEFEB1985
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Development of a Curriculum in Drug Dependency

Barry Stimmel
1974 No language available Article (EJ) Journal of Medical Education, 49, 2, 158-162, Feb 74

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ091394
Author(s): Stimmel, Barry
Title: The Development of a Curriculum in Drug Dependency
Source: Journal of Medical Education 49, 2, 158-162, Feb 74
Language: No language available
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Drug Abuse
Professional Education
(Major): Curriculum Development
Drug Addiction
Drug Education
Higher Education
Medical Education
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Date of Entry: 1974; CIJJUN1974
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Career Teacher Program Evaluation. Final Report. Volume I: The Career Teacher Program.

CONSAD Research Corp., Pittsburgh, PA.
1977 English Document (ED) 258

This first volume of the evaluation of the Career Teacher Program describes the background of the program, the purpose of the evaluation, a description of the evaluation methodology, the results and
findings of implementing the methodology, program outcomes, and conclusions and recommendations for the program. The program was designed to improve the training of medical students concerning drug
abuse and alcohol abuse by increasing the number and knowledge of academic faculty in medical schools in these areas and by developing regular courses of instruction on these major health problems,
and in continuing education programs for doctors....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED168401
Title: Career Teacher Program Evaluation. Final Report. Volume I: The Career Teacher Program.
Corp Author(s): CONSAD Research Corp., Pittsburgh, PA.
Publication: 1977-10-12
Description: 258 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This first volume of the evaluation of the Career Teacher Program describes the background of the program, the purpose of the evaluation, a description of the evaluation
methodology, the results and findings of implementing the methodology, program outcomes, and conclusions and recommendations for the program. The program was designed to improve the training of
medical students concerning drug abuse and alcohol abuse by increasing the number and knowledge of academic faculty in medical schools in these areas and by developing regular courses of instruction
on these major health problems, and in continuing education programs for doctors. Training grants to qualified degree-granting programs to provide an opportunity to fund medical school faculty
members for further training in drug abuse and addiction were authorized by the program. In order to answer evaluation questions and test the hypotheses of the study, a data collection plan involving
six different checklist instruments was developed. The activities involved: site visits to career teacher sites and training centers, a telephone survey of "career" teachers, an institutions survey
of "noncareer" teachers, a trainee mail survey, and interviews with officials of the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).
Conclusions and recommendations are presented concerning the career teacher project grantees (career teachers, sponsors, and institutions); the training centers; and the NIAAA and NIDA. (SW)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Education
College Faculty
Curriculum Development
Data Collection
Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Faculty Development
Higher Education
Medical Education
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Physicians
Professional Continuing Education
Professional Training
Program Evaluation
Identifier: National Institute on Drug Abuse; National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Career Teacher Program
Note(s): Associated Inst: National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD.; National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Date of Entry: 1979
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Resource Manual for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Education in Internal Medicine.

JudyAnn Ed Bigby; Susan Ed England
1988 English Document (ED) 47

The resource manual provides guidelines and resources for individuals interested in integrating a substance abuse curriculum into existing programs for medical students and residents in internal
medicine. Materials and resources appropriate for practicing physicians are also included. Three sections are: (1) a statement of minimum knowledge and clinical skills for all practicing physicians,
medical students, practicing interns and internal medical residents, and medical students completing internal medicine clinical experiences (e.g....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED316150
Title: Resource Manual for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Education in Internal Medicine.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Bigby, JudyAnn, Ed. ; England, Susan, Ed.
Corp Author(s): Society of General Internal Medicine.
Publication: 1988-00-00
Description: 47 p.
Language: English
Abstract: The resource manual provides guidelines and resources for individuals interested in integrating a substance abuse curriculum into existing programs for medical students and
residents in internal medicine. Materials and resources appropriate for practicing physicians are also included. Three sections are: (1) a statement of minimum knowledge and clinical skills for all
practicing physicians, medical students, practicing interns and internal medical residents, and medical students completing internal medicine clinical experiences (e.g., general concepts, prevention,
pharmacology and pathophysiology, evaluation of patient, patient management, legal aspects, and impairment of health professionals); (2) a description of resources and activities for reaching
selected goals and achieving the minimum knowledge and clinical skills desirable for general internists (including residents and students) in managing patients who abuse alcohol and other drugs; and
(3) a list of model curricula. This document contains approximately 200 references and a list of 23 audiovisual material resources. (SM)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Abuse
Drug Abuse
Graduate Medical Students
Higher Education
Internal Medicine
Medical Education
Physicians
Reference Materials
Resource Materials
(Major): Curriculum Development
Medical Students
Substance Abuse
Note(s): Contract No: ADM 281-85-0013; Associated Inst: National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.; National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHHS), Rockville,
MD.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Date of Entry: 1990; RIEJUL1990
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Substance Abuse, School Policy and Special Education.

Ellen Spero
1988 English Document (ED) 22

This paper reviews the literature which examines school policies currently guiding educational practice in the area of student substance abuse and discusses the relationship between special education
and substance-using and substance-abusing students. Reviewed are: (1) definitions of substance abuse, which vary with the conceptualization of the problem, based on various models--moral, legal,
medical, social learning, or ecological; (2) court cases which indicate that when drug or alcohol use by a special education student is related to a handicapping condition, exclusion from school does
not appear to be an appropriate response; (3) studies on school performance and substance abuse, supporting the conclusion that substance-using adolescents are less committed to education and at
greater risk for leaving school before graduating; (4) requirements that schools provide specialized educational services to students who abuse drugs; and (5) current responses of high schools to
drug and alcohol use/abuse among students....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED312797
Title: Substance Abuse, School Policy and Special Education.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Spero, Ellen ; And Others
Publication: 1988-12-00
Description: 22 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This paper reviews the literature which examines school policies currently guiding educational practice in the area of student substance abuse and discusses the relationship
between special education and substance-using and substance-abusing students. Reviewed are: (1) definitions of substance abuse, which vary with the conceptualization of the problem, based on various
models--moral, legal, medical, social learning, or ecological; (2) court cases which indicate that when drug or alcohol use by a special education student is related to a handicapping condition,
exclusion from school does not appear to be an appropriate response; (3) studies on school performance and substance abuse, supporting the conclusion that substance-using adolescents are less
committed to education and at greater risk for leaving school before graduating; (4) requirements that schools provide specialized educational services to students who abuse drugs; and (5) current
responses of high schools to drug and alcohol use/abuse among students. The paper outlines reasons that schools should address the issue of policies and practices in the area of substance abuse and
lists recommended steps to be taken by educators. (JDD)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Academic Achievement
Adolescents
Court Litigation
Discipline Policy
Dropouts
High Schools
Special Education
(Major): Alcoholism
Disabilities
Drug Addiction
Policy Formation
School Policy
Substance Abuse
Note(s): Contract No: G00-8530284; G00-8715099/ Audience: Practitioners/ Policymakers; Associated Inst: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (ED),
Washington, DC.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Opinion Papers
Date of Entry: 1990; RIEAPR1990
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Project DARE: Teaching Kids To Say "No" to Drugs and Alcohol.

William DeJong
1986 English Document (ED) 5

A joint project of the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Unified School District, Project DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) is designed to equip elementary and junior high school
children with the skills for resisting peer pressure to experiment with drugs and alcohol. The goal is to teach students how to say "no." A growing consensus among experts in education and medicine
holds that substance abuse prevention must begin early, well before children have been led by their peers to experiment with drugs and alcohol....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED309338
Title: Project DARE: Teaching Kids To Say "No" to Drugs and Alcohol.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): DeJong, William
Corp Author(s): Department of Justice, Washington, DC. National Inst. of Justice.
Publication: 1986-03-00
Description: 5 p.
Language: English
Abstract: A joint project of the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Unified School District, Project DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) is designed to equip elementary
and junior high school children with the skills for resisting peer pressure to experiment with drugs and alcohol. The goal is to teach students how to say "no." A growing consensus among experts in
education and medicine holds that substance abuse prevention must begin early, well before children have been led by their peers to experiment with drugs and alcohol. Most important, Project DARE
introduces this training just at the time when the peer pressure begins. DARE's instructors are Los Angeles police officers on full-time duty with the project. Assigned to five schools per semester,
the officers visit classrooms once a week to present an innovative curriculum developed by school district personnel. Veteran police officers with several years of street experience, the DARE
instructors have a credibility unmatched by regular classroom teachers. Through the DARE lessons, students learn that: real friends will not push them into trying drugs and alcohol; the majority of
their peers do not use these substances; being grown up means making their own decisions and coping with problems in a positive way; and they can assert themselves in the face of peer pressure. The
DARE curriculum is organized into 17 classroom sessions in which a wide range of teaching activities are used that are designed to encourage student participation and response. (ABL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Assertiveness
Curriculum
Elementary School Students
Junior High School Students
Junior High Schools
Peer Influence
Police
(Major): Alcohol Abuse
Drug Abuse
Elementary Education
Police School Relationship
Prevention
Note(s): Reprinted from NIJ Reports.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1990; RIEJAN1990
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Knowledge of Medical Students, Residents, and Attending Physicians About Opiate Abuse.

Daniel Demas Penelope Shine
1984 English Article (EJ) Journal of Medical Education, v59 n6 p501-07 Jun 1984

A questionnaire concerning knowledge of opiate abuse and attitudes about abusers was administered to 94 randomly selected physicians and medical students at Montefiore Medical Center in New York
City. The results indicated that physicians might benefit from improved teaching in the area of opiate abuse. (Author/MLW)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ301580
Author(s): Shine, Daniel, Demas, Penelope
Title: Knowledge of Medical Students, Residents, and Attending Physicians About Opiate Abuse.
Source: Journal of Medical Education v59 n6 p501-07 Jun 1984
Language: English
Abstract: A questionnaire concerning knowledge of opiate abuse and attitudes about abusers was administered to 94 randomly selected physicians and medical students at Montefiore Medical
Center in New York City. The results indicated that physicians might benefit from improved teaching in the area of opiate abuse. (Author/MLW)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Curriculum Development
Drug Abuse
Drug Addiction
Drug Education
Graduate Medical Students
Higher Education
Medical Education
Medical Students
Physicians
Questionnaires
Surveys
Identifier: Methadone
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Journal Articles
Date of Entry: 1984
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Curriculum Guide for Psychiatry Faculty. Medicine 2. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resource Series.

Donald S Gallant
1982 English Document (ED) 81

This guide, one of a series of publications written for medical school faculty to use in designing substance abuse instruction, focuses on curriculum content for drug and alcohol abuse instruction.
Following a brief introduction, discussions of positive attitude development toward substance abuse patients, and the psychological, cultural, and biological aspects of substance abuse are
presented....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED241837
Title: Alcohol and Drug Abuse Curriculum Guide for Psychiatry Faculty. Medicine 2. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resource Series.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Gallant, Donald S.
Corp Author(s): National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. ; National Clearinghouse for Alcohol Information (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Publication: 1982-00-00
Description: 81 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This guide, one of a series of publications written for medical school faculty to use in designing substance abuse instruction, focuses on curriculum content for drug and alcohol
abuse instruction. Following a brief introduction, discussions of positive attitude development toward substance abuse patients, and the psychological, cultural, and biological aspects of substance
abuse are presented. Diagnostic techniques, patient referral and early intervention therapeutic treatment techniques, especially with adolescents, are also discussed. Treatment of acute and chronic
phases of alcohol and drug abuse, and therapy goals and techniques are explored. Substance abuse among physicians is presented in terms of early symptoms, problems in delayed treatment, and
successful treatment; and substance induced organic mental disorders are discussed. A section on community prevention of substance abuse focuses on primary (legal and educational approaches),
secondary (medical and legal approaches), and tertiary prevention. The guide concludes with a list of references, appendices, and tables dealing with diagnostic instruments and drug signs and
symptoms, and an annotated list of curriculum materials. (BL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Curriculum Guides
Health Education
Health Personnel
Higher Education
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Psychiatry
(Major): Alcoholism
Curriculum Development
Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Medical Education
Note(s): For related document, see CG 017 313. Appendix C, "A Technique for Intervention and Confrontation of Substance Abusers," by Michael Liepman, is copyrighted and therefore not
available./ Contract No: ADM-281-79-0001/ Audience: Teachers/ Practitioners/ Report: DHHS-ADM-82-1159; Associated Inst: National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
(DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Date of Entry: 1984; RIEAUG1984
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Teaching Methodology Guide for Medical Faculty. Medicine 1. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resource Series.

Jeptha R Hostetler
1982 English Document (ED) 47

This guide, one of a series of publications written for medical faculty to use in designing substance abuse instruction, focuses on the teaching of alcohol and drug abuse intervention in medical and
osteopathic schools. Following a brief introducton to the booklet, the career teacher program, which is supported by federal grants, is explained. Curriculum objectives, focusing on definitions;
scientific, social, and psychological factors; diagnosis; treatment; and prevention, are given....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED241836
Title: Alcohol and Drug Abuse Teaching Methodology Guide for Medical Faculty. Medicine 1. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resource Series.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Hostetler, Jeptha R.
Corp Author(s): National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. ; National Clearinghouse for Alcohol Information (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Publication: 1982-00-00
Description: 47 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This guide, one of a series of publications written for medical faculty to use in designing substance abuse instruction, focuses on the teaching of alcohol and drug abuse
intervention in medical and osteopathic schools. Following a brief introducton to the booklet, the career teacher program, which is supported by federal grants, is explained. Curriculum objectives,
focusing on definitions; scientific, social, and psychological factors; diagnosis; treatment; and prevention, are given. A discussion on attitude change as a goal of education and a description of
various teaching modalities complete chapter 1. Chapter 2 discusses the teaching methodologies of clinical teaching, lecture, interactive teaching, role playing, computer-assisted instruction, small
group setting, and audiovisual utilization. For each methodology specific goals or discussion points are offered. The booklet concludes with a list of references and three appendices: the curriculum
objectives and goals; an annotated audiovisual materials listing; and an annotated listing of other teaching materials/resources with addresses. (BL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Audiovisual Aids
Curriculum
Health Education
Higher Education
Instructional Materials
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Teaching Guides
(Major): Alcoholism
Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Medical Education
Teaching Methods
Note(s): For related document, see CG 017 314./ Contract No: ADM-281-79-0001/ Audience: Teachers/ Practitioners/ Report: DHHS-ADM-82-1158; Associated Inst:
National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Date of Entry: 1984; RIEAUG1984
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Caring, Coping, Change: Challenges for the 80's. A Report of the National Indian Child Conference (4th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 12-16, 1982).

Save the Children, Albuquerque, NM.
1982 English Document (ED) 53

The report of the fourth National Indian Child Conference (1982), sponsored by Save the Children, contains a statistical portrait of the American Indian child, synopses of 7 major presentations and
64 workshops, recommendations, a conference evaluation, and lists of conference staff, presenters, and tribal representation. Topics of major presentations are traditional Indian medicine; ways to
teach children a Native American perspective; microcomputers in education; trends in education; Save the Children; family day care; and leadership....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED234936
Title: Caring, Coping, Change: Challenges for the 80's. A Report of the National Indian Child Conference (4th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 12-16, 1982).
Corp Author(s): Save the Children, Albuquerque, NM.
Publication: 1982-00-00
Description: 53 p.
Language: English
Abstract: The report of the fourth National Indian Child Conference (1982), sponsored by Save the Children, contains a statistical portrait of the American Indian child, synopses of 7 major
presentations and 64 workshops, recommendations, a conference evaluation, and lists of conference staff, presenters, and tribal representation. Topics of major presentations are traditional Indian
medicine; ways to teach children a Native American perspective; microcomputers in education; trends in education; Save the Children; family day care; and leadership. Workshop topics include
self-esteem, creative writing, community planning, cultural awareness/preservation, handicapped children, suicide prevention, mental health programs, parenting, bilingual education, adult education,
child abuse, fund raising, local school boards, teenage pregnancy, preventative health education, early childhood education, gifted children, and substance abuse and therapy. Recommendations
presented are for increased funding for Indian Child Welfare Act programs; improved communication between federal agencies affecting Indian children; opposition to closure of the Southwestern Indian
Polytechnical Institute and other Indian schools; dissemination of information regarding the 1982 Indian Housing Act to Indian communities; continued pre-kindergarten programs through Indian Student
Equalization Programs; increased community involvement in planning preventative health education curriculum; school-age parenting classes and child care in Indian communities; and encouraging use of
native foods through the schools. (MH)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Adult Education
Alcohol Education
American Indian Education
American Indians
Bilingual Education
Child Abuse
Child Welfare
Children
Cultural Awareness
Cultural Education
Day Care
Educational Trends
Elementary Secondary Education
Family Programs
Health Education
Health Programs
Human Resources
Leadership
Microcomputers
Parenthood Education
Preschool Education
Self Esteem
Special Programs
Tribes
Youth Problems
Identifier: Traditional Healing; Save the Children Fund; National Indian Child Conference 4th
Note(s): Associated Inst: Save the Children, Westport, CT.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Collected Works - Proceedings
Date of Entry: 1984
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A Division of Substance Abuse Medicine in a Teaching Hospital.

William D Lerner
1986 English Article (EJ) Journal of Medical Education, v61 n7 p606-08 Jul 1986

Physicians are likely to encounter a wide gamut of disorders related to drug and alcohol abuse and will need specialized knowledge and skills to treat the affected population effectively. The
development and implementation of a program to meet these needs at the Medical College of Virginia is described. (MLW)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ339040
Author(s): Lerner, William D. ; And Others
Title: A Division of Substance Abuse Medicine in a Teaching Hospital.
Source: Journal of Medical Education v61 n7 p606-08 Jul 1986
Language: English
Abstract: Physicians are likely to encounter a wide gamut of disorders related to drug and alcohol abuse and will need specialized knowledge and skills to treat the affected population
effectively. The development and implementation of a program to meet these needs at the Medical College of Virginia is described. (MLW)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcoholism
Drug Abuse
Higher Education
Medical Education
Program Descriptions
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Teaching Hospitals
Identifier: Medical College of Virginia
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1986
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education for Physician Assistants: A Survey of Physician Assistant Attitudes and Perceptions about Prescribing Practices and Substance Abuse.

N Peter Johnson
1986 English Article (EJ) Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education, v31 n2 p52-59 Win 1986

Physician assistant attitudes and perceptions about substance abuse education and prescribing practices indicate that 81 percent of respondents were responsible for prescribing. Of prescribers, 97.7
percent counseled about medication; of nonprescribers, 95.0 percent counseled about medication. Diagnosis and prevention were the most highly ranked aspects of substance abuse education needed....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ335598
Author(s): Johnson, N. Peter ; And Others
Title: Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education for Physician Assistants: A Survey of Physician Assistant Attitudes and Perceptions about Prescribing Practices and Substance Abuse.
Source: Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education v31 n2 p52-59 Win 1986
Language: English
Abstract: Physician assistant attitudes and perceptions about substance abuse education and prescribing practices indicate that 81 percent of respondents were responsible for prescribing.
Of prescribers, 97.7 percent counseled about medication; of nonprescribers, 95.0 percent counseled about medication. Diagnosis and prevention were the most highly ranked aspects of substance abuse
education needed. (Author/BL)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Drug Abuse
(Major): Alcohol Education
Drug Education
Employee Attitudes
Perception
Physicians Assistants
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Date of Entry: 1986; CIJSEP1986
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Neglected Disease in Medical Education.

Constance Holden
1985 English Article (EJ) Science, v229 n4715 p741-42 Aug 23 1985

Medical schools are finally teaching about alcoholism, a disease implicated in 20-50 percent of hospital admissions and which is a problem in the medical profession itself. Recent discoveries on
identifying/treating alcoholism have helped to change attitudes and lead to model problems for medical students at Johns Hopkins and Dartmouth. (DH)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ324389
Author(s): Holden, Constance
Title: The Neglected Disease in Medical Education.
Source: Science v229 n4715 p741-42 Aug 23 1985
Language: English
Abstract: Medical schools are finally teaching about alcoholism, a disease implicated in 20-50 percent of hospital admissions and which is a problem in the medical profession itself. Recent
discoveries on identifying/treating alcoholism have helped to change attitudes and lead to model problems for medical students at Johns Hopkins and Dartmouth. (DH)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Drug Addiction
Educational Trends
Higher Education
Medical Schools
(Major): Alcoholism
Clinical Experience
Clinical Teaching (Health Professions)
Medical Education
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1986; CIJJAN1986
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dulce Public Schools Community Education Needs Assessment.

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Bureau of Educational Planning and Development.
1984 English Document (ED) 135

Adults in a multi-ethnic, small, rural school district were surveyed to determine their evaluation and expectations of district schools. Of the 301 respondents, 72% were Jicarilla Apache/other
Indian, 14% Spanish/Mexican, and 14% Anglo; most were aged 19-45; 81% had completed high school; 76% were employed. Respondents rated the elementary, high, and parochial schools generally adequate,
particularly in facilities, bussing, and teachers, but found counseling services unsatisfactory; strongly supported occupational training, personal finance classes, cultural heritage emphasis, and a
substance abuse program; found lack of motivation, self-discipline, and parental involvement the most common impediments to education; rated high school graduation very important; and believed
student goals should be good grades and preparation for further education and employment....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED264053
Title: Dulce Public Schools Community Education Needs Assessment.
Corp Author(s): New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Bureau of Educational Planning and Development.
Publication: 1984-03-00
Description: 135 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Adults in a multi-ethnic, small, rural school district were surveyed to determine their evaluation and expectations of district schools. Of the 301 respondents, 72% were Jicarilla
Apache/other Indian, 14% Spanish/Mexican, and 14% Anglo; most were aged 19-45; 81% had completed high school; 76% were employed. Respondents rated the elementary, high, and parochial schools
generally adequate, particularly in facilities, bussing, and teachers, but found counseling services unsatisfactory; strongly supported occupational training, personal finance classes, cultural
heritage emphasis, and a substance abuse program; found lack of motivation, self-discipline, and parental involvement the most common impediments to education; rated high school graduation very
important; and believed student goals should be good grades and preparation for further education and employment. Respondents recognized that parents have a primary responsibility for education and
wanted the school system to teach basic skills. The survey's second part, answered by Jicarilla Apache tribal members, evaluated programs offered by tribal government and demonstrated need for better
communication between residents, school system, and tribal government, and need for more adult education. Survey conclusions included the need to improve communication between school system and
residents, to improve social behavior and educational climate, and to integrate native language and culture into the schools. (LFL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: American Indian Education
American Indians
Anglo Americans
Community Surveys
Educational Assessment
Elementary Secondary Education
Mexican Americans
Needs Assessment
Parent Attitudes
Program Evaluation
Rural Education
Rural Schools
School Community Relationship
School Effectiveness
Small Schools
Spanish Americans
Tribes
Identifier: Jicarilla Apache (Tribe); New Mexico (Dulce); Tribal Government
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Date of Entry: 1986
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Curriculum for Community Health Workers.

Paula S Southwick
1985 English Document (ED) 15

The Community Outreach Curriculum described in this paper is designed to prepare community health aides employed through the Outreach Department of Pima County (Arizona) Indian Health Inc., (PCIHI),
which consists of two medical clinics on two separate reservations. The first sections of the paper describe PCIHI, provide a rationale for the curriculum based on the rising community health needs
of the Indian population of Pima County, offer a statement of goals and objectives for the curriculum, and describe the students for whom the curriculum is intended....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED263951
Title: Curriculum for Community Health Workers.
Author(s): Southwick, Paula S.
Publication: 1985-10-29
Description: 15 p.
Language: English
Abstract: The Community Outreach Curriculum described in this paper is designed to prepare community health aides employed through the Outreach Department of Pima County (Arizona) Indian
Health Inc., (PCIHI), which consists of two medical clinics on two separate reservations. The first sections of the paper describe PCIHI, provide a rationale for the curriculum based on the rising
community health needs of the Indian population of Pima County, offer a statement of goals and objectives for the curriculum, and describe the students for whom the curriculum is intended. Next,
brief descriptions of the following courses offered in the curriculum are given: (1) Traffic Safety; (2) Patient Vital Signs; (3) Charting; (4) First Aid; (5) Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation; (6)
Hygiene; (7) Diet; (8) Venereal Disease; (9) Contraception; (10) Health in Pregnancy; (11) New Baby Care; (12) Parasites; (13) Home Bound Patients; (14) Diabetic Teaching; (15) Hypertension; and (16)
Substance Abuse. The final sections of the paper examine issues related to the implementation of the curriculum, evaluation criteria for each of the curricular objectives, and procedures for
curriculum revision. (LAL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Allied Health Occupations Education
College Curriculum
Community Health Services
Course Content
Curriculum Design
Curriculum Development
Health Education
Health Personnel
Health Services
Outreach Programs
Postsecondary Education
Identifier: Arizona (Pima County); Arizona
Note(s): Audience: Teachers/ Practitioners
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Date of Entry: 1986
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Masculinity, Femininity, and Psychosocial Adjustment in Medical Students: Two-Year Follow-Up.

Peter B Zeldow
1985 English Document (ED) 22

Although research on masculinity and femininity has increased over the past decade, longitudinal studies addressing predictive elements are lacking. The Rush Medical College Longitudinal Study
examines the correlation between masculinity and femininity on the one hand and adjustment, interpersonal functioning, and impairment on the other. During orientation, 67 male and 32 female
first-year medical students completed the Personality Attributes Questionnaire and 21 months later also completed measures of psychological well-being, interpersonal functioning, humanistic attitudes
toward patient care, and alcohol consumption....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED262339
Title: Masculinity, Femininity, and Psychosocial Adjustment in Medical Students: Two-Year Follow-Up.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Zeldow, Peter B. ; And Others
Publication: 1985-08-00
Description: 22 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Although research on masculinity and femininity has increased over the past decade, longitudinal studies addressing predictive elements are lacking. The Rush Medical College
Longitudinal Study examines the correlation between masculinity and femininity on the one hand and adjustment, interpersonal functioning, and impairment on the other. During orientation, 67 male and
32 female first-year medical students completed the Personality Attributes Questionnaire and 21 months later also completed measures of psychological well-being, interpersonal functioning, humanistic
attitudes toward patient care, and alcohol consumption. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses with interaction terms revealed main effects of masculinity on self-esteem, extroversion, and
confidence, and main effects of femininity on hedonic capacity, interpersonal satisfaction, sharing of personal problems, and alcohol consumption. Measures of impaired mood and alcohol and drug
impairment were also studied in relation to masculinity and femininity. Both variables contributed to the prediction of depressed mood; femininity also contributed to the prediction of drug
impairment. Neither scale has sufficient sensitivity or specificity to be used by itself as a test of impairment. Further study is needed to measure the precise relationship among low femininity, low
hedonic capacity, and high potential for substance abuse. (Six data tables are included.) (Author/TW)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Depression (Psychology)
Drinking
Drug Abuse
Femininity
Followup Studies
Higher Education
Interpersonal Competence
Masculinity
Medical Education
Medical Students
Personality Traits
Predictor Variables
Self Esteem
Social Adjustment
Student Attitudes
Identifier: Substance Abuse; Alcohol Abuse
Note(s): Audience: Researchers; Associated Inst: Chicago Community Trust, IL.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Date of Entry: 1986
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alcohol Abuse and Its Implications for Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.
1985 English Document (ED) 132 Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402.

This document contains transcripts of testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the effects of alcoholism on children and families. Testimonies are presented
from the director of the Alcoholism Control Administration, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; the medical director of the Alcoholism and Compulsive Gambling Programs; the vice president
(programs) of the National Federation of Parents for Drug-Free Youth; vice-chairperson of the Florida Governor's Commission on Drug and Alcohol Concerns; a juvenile court judge from Ohio; the
presiding justice of the Quincy District Court, Quincy, Massachusetts; the administrator of the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration, Department of Health and Human Services; and from
recovering alcoholics and parents of alcoholics....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED261306
Title: Alcohol Abuse and Its Implications for Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First
Session.
Access ERIC: FullText
Corp Author(s): Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.
Publication: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402.; 1985-03-18
Description: 132 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This document contains transcripts of testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the effects of alcoholism on children and families.
Testimonies are presented from the director of the Alcoholism Control Administration, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; the medical director of the Alcoholism and Compulsive Gambling Programs;
the vice president (programs) of the National Federation of Parents for Drug-Free Youth; vice-chairperson of the Florida Governor's Commission on Drug and Alcohol Concerns; a juvenile court judge
from Ohio; the presiding justice of the Quincy District Court, Quincy, Massachusetts; the administrator of the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration, Department of Health and Human
Services; and from recovering alcoholics and parents of alcoholics. Topics covered include the causes of alcoholism, the need for education at all levels about the causes and consequences of
drinking, state and federal efforts to promote substance abuse prevention and education, and treatment needs of children and families involved in alcohol abuse. The appendix contains the prepared
statements, letters, and supplemental materials submitted for the record. (MCF)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Adolescents
Alcoholism
Drug Abuse
Educational Needs
Family Counseling
Family Problems
Family Relationship
Hearings
Parent Child Relationship
Prevention
State Programs
Identifier: Congress 99th
Note(s): Audience: Policymakers
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Date of Entry: 1986
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Career Teacher Grant Program: Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education for the Health Professions.

Sharon M Labs
1981 English Article (EJ) Journal of Medical Education, v56 n3 p202-04 Mar 1981

A model for improving medical training in substance abuse is presented based on the proposals of 22 Career Teacher Grant Programs. The grant provides support for training medical faculty to develop
and implement a substance abuse curriculum. The model includes objectives for initial preparations and advice regarding the development and implementation phases. (JMD)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ242609
Author(s): Labs, Sharon M.
Title: The Career Teacher Grant Program: Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education for the Health Professions.
Access ERIC: FullText
Source: Journal of Medical Education v56 n3 p202-04 Mar 1981
Language: English
Abstract: A model for improving medical training in substance abuse is presented based on the proposals of 22 Career Teacher Grant Programs. The grant provides support for training medical
faculty to develop and implement a substance abuse curriculum. The model includes objectives for initial preparations and advice regarding the development and implementation phases. (JMD)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Education
Alcoholism
Curriculum Development
Curriculum Evaluation
Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Educational Objectives
Guidelines
Higher Education
Interdisciplinary Approach
Medical Education
Medical School Faculty
Models
Identifier: Career Teacher Grant Program
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles
Date of Entry: 1981
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Study Shows How Barbiturates Affect Brain

1973 No language available Article (EJ) Chemical and Engineering News, 51, 17, 39-40, Apr 73

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ076339
Title: Study Shows How Barbiturates Affect Brain
Source: Chemical and Engineering News 51, 17, 39-40, Apr 73
Language: No language available
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Biological Sciences
Drug Therapy
Metabolism
Rats
Resource Materials
Scientific Research
(Major): Drug Addiction
Health Education
Medical Education
Narcotics
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Date of Entry: 1973; CIJSEP1973
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Task Force Report: Narcotics and Drug Abuse.

President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.
1967 No language available Document (ED) 167

This report contains a number of the papers submitted to the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, by outside consultants. Chapter Eight of that commission's
report, "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society," is reprinted at the beginning of this report, with the addition of annotations to indicate source materials considered....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED066678
Title: Task Force Report: Narcotics and Drug Abuse.
Access ERIC: FullText
Corp Author(s): President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.
Publication: 1967-00-00
Description: 167 p.
Language: No language available
Abstract: This report contains a number of the papers submitted to the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, by outside consultants. Chapter Eight of that
commission's report, "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society," is reprinted at the beginning of this report, with the addition of annotations to indicate source materials considered. But this
volume does not in any sense embody a comprehensive treatment of the complex and important problems of drug abuse. Limitation of resources has led this commission to limit the scope and depth of its
work in this area. Among the topics discussed in this report are: (1) the drugs and their reputation, (2) enforcement, (3) drug abuse and crime, (4) penalties, (5) marihuana, (6) treatment, (7) civil
commitment, (8) medical practice and addiction, and (9) education. Six appendix sections are presented covering such topics as dangerous drugs, narcotics, drug legislation, treatment of drug
addiction, and civil commitment of narcotic addicts. (Author/BW)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Antisocial Behavior
Crime
Law Enforcement
Legal Problems
Marihuana
(Major): Drug Abuse
Drug Addiction
Drug Education
Drug Legislation
Narcotics
Document Type: Document (ED)
Date of Entry: 1973; RIEJAN1973
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Substance Use and Older Persons.

Lillian A Miller; Stephen F Alexander
1981 English Document (ED) 105 Northwestern Community Services, P.O. Box 632, Winchester, VA 22601 ($10.50).

This guide contains materials developed for senior adults and service providers concerned with substance abuse by the elderly. A module, "Substance Use and Older Persons," is presented in a
session-by-session outline of the three one-hour programs. The agenda for the first two sessions focuses on prescription and over-the-counter drugs, while the agenda for the third session
concentrates on alcohol education....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED211876
Title: Substance Use and Older Persons.
Author(s): Miller, Lillian A. ; Alexander, Stephen F.
Publication: Northwestern Community Services, P.O. Box 632, Winchester, VA 22601 ($10.50).; 1981-00-00
Description: 105 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This guide contains materials developed for senior adults and service providers concerned with substance abuse by the elderly. A module, "Substance Use and Older Persons," is
presented in a session-by-session outline of the three one-hour programs. The agenda for the first two sessions focuses on prescription and over-the-counter drugs, while the agenda for the third
session concentrates on alcohol education. Use of the module as both an inservice training program for senior center staff members and as an educational program for senior center participants is
described. Training session handouts and center presentation handouts are provided along with evaluation forms. Followup materials are provided, including: (1) a three-part article to be used as a
handout for participants; (2) center presentation handouts; and (3) a brochure, "Be Responsible for Your Own Health." A one and one-half hour component condensed from the three-hour module for use in
senior clubs and other community or civic organizations is outlined. Additionally, a four-hour alcohol awareness module for delivery to residents and staff in a adult home is presented. (NRB)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Community Education
Community Organizations
Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Instructional Materials
Staff Development
(Major): Adult Education
Alcohol Education
Drug Use
Inservice Education
Older Adults
Service Workers
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Date of Entry: 1982; RIEJUN1982
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Institution Libraries Statistics/1979-80.

New York State Library, Albany.
1980 English Document (ED) 39

This compilation of annual reports of 151 New York State institution libraries for the year ending March 31, 1980, presents data on total resident population, library materials, dollar expenditures,
and weekly staff hours. The types of institutions represented include correctional services, division of substance abuse services, education, health, office of mental health, office of mental
retardation, and developmental disabilities and youth....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED211096
Title: Institution Libraries Statistics/1979-80.
Corp Author(s): New York State Library, Albany.
Publication: 1980-00-00
Description: 39 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This compilation of annual reports of 151 New York State institution libraries for the year ending March 31, 1980, presents data on total resident population, library materials,
dollar expenditures, and weekly staff hours. The types of institutions represented include correctional services, division of substance abuse services, education, health, office of mental health,
office of mental retardation, and developmental disabilities and youth. In a separate table, a comparative summary indicates annual library expenditures for salary, materials, and other categories by
institution type since 1973, including percentages of increase and decrease. Appendices comprise a key to the abbreviations used; a directory of state institutions which includes their addresses, the
state department and system with which they are associated, and the names of both the librarian and the head of the institution; and a list of public library systems showing the institutions in the
same geographical area. (RBF)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Annual Reports
Institutional Libraries
Institutions
Library Circulation
Library Expenditures
Library Materials
Library Networks
Library Personnel
Working Hours
Identifier: Library Statistics
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reference Materials - Directories/Catalogs
Date of Entry: 1982
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reading and Writing; Adult Education in Comprehensive Combined Addiction Treatment: Needs, Problems, and Benefits.

Karl A Schneider
1976 No language available Document (ED) 60

This paper describes the results of the first year of the Eagleville Reading Academy and Satellite Program, a demonstration project funded by the U.S. Office of Education, Right to Read. Eagleville
Hospital and Rehabilitation Center treats addicts and alcoholics in a combined abstinent therapeutic community program setting. The goals of the Eagleville Reading Academy Grant are as follows: (1)
To demonstrate the necessity of individualized adult personalized education assistance for addicts and alcoholics as an integral component of the addiction/treatment rehabilitation process in the
therapeutic community; (2) To develop a model program which involves a team concept of professionally accredited teachers working with a core group of trained volunteers who will work in concert with
a resident/candidate; (3) To create a variety of methods, approaches and particularly high interest materials; (4) To offer referral and follow-up services linking to other adult educational programs
when patients leave the Eagleville program; and (5) To offer an evaluation process of the effect of education on recovery and to provide data concerning this relationship....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED155539
Title: Reading and Writing; Adult Education in Comprehensive Combined Addiction Treatment: Needs, Problems, and Benefits.
Author(s): Schneider, Karl A. ; And Others
Publication: 1976-09-16
Description: 60 p.
Language: No language available
Abstract: This paper describes the results of the first year of the Eagleville Reading Academy and Satellite Program, a demonstration project funded by the U.S. Office of Education, Right
to Read. Eagleville Hospital and Rehabilitation Center treats addicts and alcoholics in a combined abstinent therapeutic community program setting. The goals of the Eagleville Reading Academy Grant
are as follows: (1) To demonstrate the necessity of individualized adult personalized education assistance for addicts and alcoholics as an integral component of the addiction/treatment
rehabilitation process in the therapeutic community; (2) To develop a model program which involves a team concept of professionally accredited teachers working with a core group of trained volunteers
who will work in concert with a resident/candidate; (3) To create a variety of methods, approaches and particularly high interest materials; (4) To offer referral and follow-up services linking to
other adult educational programs when patients leave the Eagleville program; and (5) To offer an evaluation process of the effect of education on recovery and to provide data concerning this
relationship. Eagleville's first-year operational data indicate that remedial education is an integral component for patient recovery in drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs. (Author/JLL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Adult Basic Education
Antisocial Behavior
Patients
Program Descriptions
Program Evaluation
Therapeutic Environment
(Major): Alcoholism
Drug Addiction
Educational Therapy
Literacy Education
Rehabilitation Programs
Remedial Programs
Note(s): Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Alcohol and Drug Problem Association (27th, New Orleans, Louisiana, September 12-16, 1976) ; Some pages of the document mey be
marginally legible
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1978; RIENOV1978
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Behavioral Outcomes and Self-Concept Improvement Through Adult Education of Addicts & Alcoholics in a Combined Abstinent Therapeutic Community.

Karl A Schneider
1977 No language available Document (ED) 56

This paper describes the results of the Eagleville Reading Academy and Satellite Program, a demonstration project funded by the U.S. Office of Education. Eagleville is a private, nonprofit hospital
devoted to treatment, research, education and training for alcoholism and drug addiction. The therapeutic community setting includes individual and group therapy, industrial therapy, occupational
therapy, physical rehabilitation, family therapy and general medical care....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED153114
Title: Behavioral Outcomes and Self-Concept Improvement Through Adult Education of Addicts & Alcoholics in a Combined Abstinent Therapeutic Community.
Author(s): Schneider, Karl A. ; And Others
Publication: 1977-09-00
Description: 56 p.
Language: No language available
Abstract: This paper describes the results of the Eagleville Reading Academy and Satellite Program, a demonstration project funded by the U.S. Office of Education. Eagleville is a private,
nonprofit hospital devoted to treatment, research, education and training for alcoholism and drug addiction. The therapeutic community setting includes individual and group therapy, industrial
therapy, occupational therapy, physical rehabilitation, family therapy and general medical care. Education is available on a voluntary, self-selection basis in the inpatient phase. The results of the
study show that treatment outcome for students is superior at all stages of treatment than for nonstudents. They also show that part of the improved self-concept of patients in treatment at Eagleton
is ascribable to the education program. The authors conclude that adult remedial education is an integral component for recovery and deserves serious consideration for inclusion in the continuum of
services for drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs. (Author)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcoholism
Program Descriptions
Research Projects
Self Concept
Social Behavior
(Major): Adult Basic Education
Drug Abuse
Reading Skills
Rehabilitation
Remedial Instruction
Note(s): Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Alcohol and Drug Problem Association of North America (28th, Detroit, Michigan, September 25-29, 1977)
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1978; RIESEP1978
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Teaching Medical Students about Substance Abuse in a Weekend Intervention Program.

Harvey Siegal; John R Rudisill
1983 English Article (EJ) Journal of Medical Education, v58 n4 p322-27 Apr 1983

A weekend program places medical students under supervision in close, intense contact with drug and alcohol abusers and strongly reinforces basic sciences and clinical instruction. Student reaction
has been very positive. The program requires no new resources and is cost-effective. (Author/MSE)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ281259
Author(s): Siegal, Harvey ; Rudisill, John R.
Title: Teaching Medical Students about Substance Abuse in a Weekend Intervention Program.
Source: Journal of Medical Education v58 n4 p322-27 Apr 1983
Language: English
Abstract: A weekend program places medical students under supervision in close, intense contact with drug and alcohol abusers and strongly reinforces basic sciences and clinical
instruction. Student reaction has been very positive. The program requires no new resources and is cost-effective. (Author/MSE)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Education
Alcoholism
Clinical Experience
Cost Effectiveness
Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Drug Rehabilitation
Higher Education
Medical Education
Student Participation
Weekend Programs
Identifier: Wright State University OH; Addiction
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1983
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Drug Education for University Students and Residence Services.

Richard E Miller; Leslie J Kitzerow
1982 English Document (ED) 41

Attempts at providing drug information and drug education to resident students, Residence Directors (RD's), and Residence Student Advisors (RSA's) at Kent State Universtiy (Ohio) had three major
objectives: (1) provide substance abuse awareness to residence hall students by disseminating drug information; (2) supplement the training of RD's and RSA's with drug education; and (3) institute
drug education programming in residence halls....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED223613
Title: Drug Education for University Students and Residence Services.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Miller, Richard E. ; Kitzerow, Leslie J.
Publication: 1982-10-09
Description: 41 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Attempts at providing drug information and drug education to resident students, Residence Directors (RD's), and Residence Student Advisors (RSA's) at Kent State Universtiy (Ohio)
had three major objectives: (1) provide substance abuse awareness to residence hall students by disseminating drug information; (2) supplement the training of RD's and RSA's with drug education; and
(3) institute drug education programming in residence halls. The Substance Abuse Committee, consisting of a residence-area coordinator, two RD's, and two RSA's, was formed. Resources for educating
students were obtained and distributed, and a survey to ascertain student attitudes and behavior concerning drug use was developed. The first and second objectives were accomplished successfully. The
third, implementing drug education in the dormitories, was less successful. It was felt that the university's Department of Residence Services had difficulty in perceiving and understanding the
nature of this task and its relation to their operations, and the notion of drug education was mistakenly confused with drug information. Further plans are being made for implementing a comprehensive
drug education program. Appendixes include: (1) a resource list for substance abuse information; (2) a sample survey questionnaire eliciting information on student drug involvement; (3) survey
findings from the questionnaire distributed at Kent State University; and (4) a sample drug education presentation. (JD)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: College Students
Dormitories
Drug Education
Drug Use
Higher Education
Information Dissemination
Program Development
Resident Assistants
Residential Programs
School Health Services
Student Attitudes
Identifier: Kent State University OH
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1983
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A Report on New Haven's Library Neighborhood Centers.

Meredith Bloss
1969 No language available Document (ED) 11

A library neighborhood center is a community built around a branch library, providing the usual branch library functions of self-education and improvement. Four of New Haven's eight branch libraries
are designed as library neighborhood centers. The centers are supported by the Ford Foundation, the City of New Haven, the Office of Economic Opportunity, the New Haven Foundation, and Library
Services and Construction Act (LSCA) funds....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED032078
Title: A Report on New Haven's Library Neighborhood Centers.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Bloss, Meredith
Corp Author(s): New Haven Free Public Library, CT.
Publication: 1969-06-12
Description: 11 p.
Language: No language available
Abstract: A library neighborhood center is a community built around a branch library, providing the usual branch library functions of self-education and improvement. Four of New Haven's
eight branch libraries are designed as library neighborhood centers. The centers are supported by the Ford Foundation, the City of New Haven, the Office of Economic Opportunity, the New Haven
Foundation, and Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) funds. Programs, activities, and staffing at the Centers are discussed in this report. The Centers have concentrated efforts to provide
information for six groups of users in their areas: (1) those in financial need, (2) those with consumer problems, (3) tenants, (4) those accused or convicted of a crime, (5) those with medical
problems, including alcoholism and drug addiction, and (6) those seeking higher education. Some observations on the Centers are:A.) There is still much apathy and ignorance surrounding the Centers.
B.) People-oriented librarians are necessary to ensure success for the project. C.) The multi-agency approach has been beneficial. (Author/CC)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Agency Cooperation
Cooperative Planning
Disadvantaged
Financial Support
Inner City
(Major): Community Centers
Community Involvement
Library Services
Public Libraries
Note(s): Related documents are LI 001 562 and LI 001 563.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Date of Entry: 1970; RIEJAN1970
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Project Descriptions: Model Curricula for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Physician and Nurse Education.

National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.; National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
1989 English Document (ED) 47

Brief descriptions are presented of 12 model curriculum projects which are part of a program to develop and demonstrate effective models for integrating alcohol and other drug abuse teaching into the
medical and nurse education curriculum. The models are based upon discipline-specific knowledge and skill objectives and address undergraduate, graduate, residency, and faculty training needs within
physician and nurse education....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED332565
Title: Project Descriptions: Model Curricula for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Physician and Nurse Education.
Access ERIC: FullText
Corp Author(s): National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. ; National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Publication: 1989-11-00
Description: 47 p.
Language: English
Abstract: Brief descriptions are presented of 12 model curriculum projects which are part of a program to develop and demonstrate effective models for integrating alcohol and other drug
abuse teaching into the medical and nurse education curriculum. The models are based upon discipline-specific knowledge and skill objectives and address undergraduate, graduate, residency, and
faculty training needs within physician and nurse education. The 12 curricula projects include the following: Brown University School of Medicine Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies: Project
ADEPT--Brown University Alcohol and Drug Education for Physician Training in Primary Care"; "Society of Teachers of Family Medicine--Project to Develop, Implement, and Evaluate a Model Program an
Curriculum in Alcohol and Drug Abuse in Family Medicine"; "The Johns Hopkins Hospital" Specialty Specific Model: Develop, Implement, and Evaluate a Model Program and Curriculum in Alcohol and Other
Drug Abuse for Pediatric Faculty, Residents, and Medical Students"; "The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: Development, Implementation and Evaluation of a Model Program and Curriculum in
Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Education for Medical Students, Residents, and Faculty In Internal Medicine"; "Medical College of Virginia Program for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Education, Research,
and Treatment"; "Vanderbilt University: Vanderbilt's Integrated Curriculum on Alcohol and Drugs"; "University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Education Facility: Curriculum for Clinical Competency
in Substance Abuse Medicine for Primary Care Physicians"; "University of Virginia School of Medicine: Project SAGE (Substance Abuse General Education)"; "University of North Dakota School of
Medicine: PEPSA, University of North Dakota Physician Education Project on Substance Abuse"; "New York University Division of Nursing: NIAA-NIDA Alcohol and Other Drug Curriculum Development Project
for Nursing"; "The Ohio State University College of Nursing: Project CANDID--Curriculum for Addictions Nursing: Directions for Integrated Design (Tentative)"; "University of Connecticut School of
Nursing: Project NEADA--Nursing Education Alcohol and Drug Abuse." Each description includes a list of those who worked on developing the project as well as information on purpose, approach, and
materials. (JB)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Course Descriptions
Curriculum Design
Family Practice (Medicine)
Higher Education
Internal Medicine
Pediatrics
(Major): Alcohol Abuse
Drug Abuse
Drug Education
Graduate Medical Education
Medical Education
Nursing Education
Note(s): For related documents, see HE 024 476-477./ Audience: Practitioners/ Report: RPO-736
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1991; RIEOCT1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Teaching about Substance Abuse: A Resource Manual for Faculty Development.

Stephen P Flynn
1989 English Document (ED) 50

This concise guide to resources on substance abuse is intended for those teaching in academic family medical education and reviews written and audiovisual materials, experiential learning, continuing
medical education, and networking resources. Section 1, on written and audiovisual materials, lists 36 resources with a description of each and availability information for some....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED331395
Title: Teaching about Substance Abuse: A Resource Manual for Faculty Development.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Flynn, Stephen P. ; And Others
Publication: 1989-09-00
Description: 50 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This concise guide to resources on substance abuse is intended for those teaching in academic family medical education and reviews written and audiovisual materials, experiential
learning, continuing medical education, and networking resources. Section 1, on written and audiovisual materials, lists 36 resources with a description of each and availability information for some.
SEction 2, on experiential learning includes descriptions of experiences available at several treatment centers, formal rotations at residency programs, attendance at self-help group meetings, and
substance abuse fellowships. The section on continuing education lists four short substance abuse courses sponsored by organizations such as the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Included are
descriptions of the programs and contacts for obtaining more information. Section 4, on networking resources, describes 13 organizations, their mission, materials available, meetings, and services.
In addition this section includes a list of information sources: major organizations such as the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, professional journals in substance abuse. A
final section covers other teaching resources and lists curriculum guides and resource manuals. Four appendices are attached including a membership list of Society of Teachers of Family Medicine
working and special interest groups, summaries of seven health professions projects, and a list of the 10 curriculum projects and authors. (JB)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Experiential Learning
Higher Education
Medical Education
(Major): Audiovisual Aids
Curriculum Development
Faculty Development
Family Practice (Medicine)
Professional Continuing Education
Substance Abuse
Note(s): For related documents, see HE 024 447-451./ Audience: Practitioners/ Report: PH276
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Date of Entry: 1991; RIESEP1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Substance Abuse Curriculum Development in Family Medicine: An Instructors' Manual in Two Parts.

Society for Teachers of Family Medicine, Kansas City, MO.
1989 English Document (ED) 102

This instructor's manual is a practical guide to a faculty development training program on substance abuse within family medicine emphasizing a meshing of individual curriculum projects by
participants with group instruction and support. Organized into two parts the manual describes the training program in detail in Part 1 and provides 10 actual curriculum examples in Part 2....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED331394
Title: Substance Abuse Curriculum Development in Family Medicine: An Instructors' Manual in Two Parts.
Access ERIC: FullText
Corp Author(s): Society for Teachers of Family Medicine, Kansas City, MO.
Publication: 1989-00-00
Description: 102 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This instructor's manual is a practical guide to a faculty development training program on substance abuse within family medicine emphasizing a meshing of individual curriculum
projects by participants with group instruction and support. Organized into two parts the manual describes the training program in detail in Part 1 and provides 10 actual curriculum examples in Part
2. The training program description includes a section on how to use the manual, an exposition of the program's philosophy, suggestions for evaluation, a list of the faculty resources materials and
facilities needed to run the program, suggestions for adapting the program, and practical hints for a successful program. The curriculum examples in Part Two are grouped according to educational
level including undergraduate (e.g., improving early diagnosis of substance abuse by medical students), residency (e.g., the impaired health professional), faculty (e.g., a curriculum in substance
abuse for family practice faculty), and two applicable to all levels (e.g., how to stay sober and serene in dealing with alcoholic patients). Each curriculum is outlined listing such elements as
rationale, objectives, activity sequences, instructional resources, evaluation strategies, hints to the instructor, and an appendix of key materials. (JB)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Faculty Development
Higher Education
Program Evaluation
(Major): Curriculum Development
Family Practice (Medicine)
Institutes (Training Programs)
Medical Education
Substance Abuse
Note(s): For related documents, see HE 024 447-452/ Contract No: ADM-281-87-0002/ Audience: Practitioners/ Report: PH275; Associated Inst: National Inst. on
Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.; National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Date of Entry: 1991; RIESEP1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Model Program and Curriculum in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse for Pediatric Medical Students, Residents, and Faculty. Instructor's Guide.

Hoover Adger
1988 English Document (ED) 198

This instructor's guide provides a description of the Johns Hopkins Substance Abuse Curriculum, detailed educational models and other aids for conducting substance abuse teaching activities. The
guide is in six sections with Section 1 as a brief introduction and list of 20 references. Section 2 sketches the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Substance Abuse Curriculum by listing knowledge and
attitudinal objectives organized under 5 curriculum goals....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED331392
Title: Model Program and Curriculum in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse for Pediatric Medical Students, Residents, and Faculty. Instructor's Guide.
Access ERIC: FullText
Author(s): Adger, Hoover ; And Others
Corp Author(s): Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD. School of Medicine.
Publication: 1988-00-00
Description: 198 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This instructor's guide provides a description of the Johns Hopkins Substance Abuse Curriculum, detailed educational models and other aids for conducting substance abuse teaching
activities. The guide is in six sections with Section 1 as a brief introduction and list of 20 references. Section 2 sketches the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Substance Abuse Curriculum by listing
knowledge and attitudinal objectives organized under 5 curriculum goals. Section 3, Developing the Program at Your Institution, discusses such topics as needs assessment, goals, instructional plan,
choosing teaching methods, evaluations, and recommendations. Section 4 addresses six different teaching strategies. Section 5 contains five substance abuse education modules: (1) Substance Abuse
Overview; (2) Current Drugs of Abuse; (3) Substance Abuse Interviewing; (4) Assessment and Evaluation of Adolescent Substance Abuse; (5) Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment. Each module contains a
format, session guidelines, objectives, related curriculum goal(s), synopsis, instructor's resources, session outline, instructor's materials, masters of learner's handouts, equipment list and
suggested preparation activities. A final section, Substance Abuse Resources, lists alcohol and other drug abuse resource organizations (including address, telephone number and indication of what
type of materials may be available), and audio-visual materials (with a description of each and suggestion for use). (JB)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Adolescents
Curriculum Guides
Demonstration Programs
Evaluation Methods
Higher Education
Interviews
Pediatrics
Teaching Methods
(Major): Alcohol Abuse
Clinical Diagnosis
Drug Abuse
Medical Education
Medical Evaluation
Note(s): For related documents, see HE 024 447-452./ Contract No: ADM-281-86-0009/ Audience: Practitioners/ Report: RP0745; Associated Inst: National Inst.
on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.; National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (DHHS), Rockville, MD.
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Reference Materials - Bibliographies
Date of Entry: 1991; RIESEP1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Substance-Abuse Education for Health Professionals. Report on a WHO Consultation (Vienna, Austria, May 20-22, 1987).

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.
1988 English Document (ED) 25 WHO Regional Office for Europe, Scherfigsvej 8, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.

The major results of a World Health Organization consultation meeting which was organized to examine ways and means of improving the status of substance abuse education for health professionals in
some European countries is presented. Conference participants included researchers, psychiatrists, advisers, clinicians, health administrators, and experts from 10 European countries and the United
States involved in the design and implementation of substance abuse courses in the curricula of medical schools both at the postgraduate and undergraduate level....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED329186
Title: Substance-Abuse Education for Health Professionals. Report on a WHO Consultation (Vienna, Austria, May 20-22, 1987).
Corp Author(s): World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.
Publication: WHO Regional Office for Europe, Scherfigsvej 8, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.; 1988-00-00
Description: 25 p.
Language: English
Abstract: The major results of a World Health Organization consultation meeting which was organized to examine ways and means of improving the status of substance abuse education for health
professionals in some European countries is presented. Conference participants included researchers, psychiatrists, advisers, clinicians, health administrators, and experts from 10 European countries
and the United States involved in the design and implementation of substance abuse courses in the curricula of medical schools both at the postgraduate and undergraduate level. The report discusses
several important aspects: (1) substance abuse problems in the European region including Austria, France, Spain, Sweden and the Soviet Union; (2) differences among national substance abuse policies
in the European region; (3) substance abuse education in the United States; (4) the objectives of substance abuse training; (5) training methods; (6) structural conditions for the implementation of
training programmes; and (7) postgraduate training programmes. A number of general and specific recommendations are provided for undergraduate and postgraduate training programmes. Specific
guidelines for the training of general practitioners and general psychiatrists, and for implementing programmes for disciplines specifically related to substance abuse problems are outlined together
with recommendations for training nonmedical health professionals. Participants, and their addresses and affiliations, are listed. (LPT)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Courses
Curriculum
Drug Abuse
Foreign Countries
Graduate Medical Education
Health Education
Health Personnel
Higher Education
Medical Schools
Policy Formation
Professional Education
Skills
Substance Abuse
Training Methods
Training Objectives
Undergraduate Study
Identifier: Sweden; Austria; USSR; United States; France; World Health Organization European Region; Spain; Austria; France; Spain; Sweden; United States; USSR
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Collected Works - Proceedings
Date of Entry: 1991
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Substance Abuse Units Taught by Four Specialties in Medical Schools and Residency Programs.

Ardis K Davis
1988 English Article (EJ) Journal of Medical Education, v63 n10 p739-46 Oct 1988

A survey of medical schools and residency programs in four specialties (family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, and psychiatry) sought information on the number and type of curriculum units
on substance abuse offered by them. Considerable variation in offerings was found among the specialties. (MSE)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
External Resources: Cite This Item
Accession No: EJ380344
Author(s): Davis, Ardis K. ; And Others
Title: Substance Abuse Units Taught by Four Specialties in Medical Schools and Residency Programs.
Source: Journal of Medical Education v63 n10 p739-46 Oct 1988
Language: English
Abstract: A survey of medical schools and residency programs in four specialties (family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, and psychiatry) sought information on the number and type
of curriculum units on substance abuse offered by them. Considerable variation in offerings was found among the specialties. (MSE)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Curriculum
Drug Abuse
Graduate Medical Education
Higher Education
National Surveys
Specialization
(Major): Drug Education
Family Practice (Medicine)
Internal Medicine
Medical Education
Pediatrics
Psychiatry
Document Type: Article (EJ)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Date of Entry: 1989; CIJAPR1989
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Weekend Intervention Program.

Harvey A Siegal
1988 English Document (ED) 21

The Weekend Intervention Program (WIP) at the Wright State University School of Medicine is described in this report. Designed to address severe health and social problems while supporting the
university's academic mission, the program began with the goal of addressing the health and social problems of alcohol abusers. WIP is a 72-hour intensive program of education and counseling for
alcohol abusers which provides local courts a therapeutic alternative to incarceration for people convicted of alcohol-related offenses....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED306845
Title: The Weekend Intervention Program.
Author(s): Siegal, Harvey A.
Corp Author(s): Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH. ; American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.
Publication: 1988-00-00
Description: 21 p.
Language: English
Abstract: The Weekend Intervention Program (WIP) at the Wright State University School of Medicine is described in this report. Designed to address severe health and social problems while
supporting the university's academic mission, the program began with the goal of addressing the health and social problems of alcohol abusers. WIP is a 72-hour intensive program of education and
counseling for alcohol abusers which provides local courts a therapeutic alternative to incarceration for people convicted of alcohol-related offenses. Its educational strength is a "real world"
experience that gives understanding and skills in helping people with substance abuse problems. Medical student participation in the WIP is required. As participant-observers, students work in the
counseling groups conducted by professionals. They attend alcohol/drug education sessions and a introductory meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous. Evidence of program effectiveness includes the following:
WIP was the first driver-intervention program accredited by the Ohio Department of Health; WIP now serves a 10-county area adjacent to the university; WIP personnel make presentations at major
national and international traffic safety and substance abuse conferences; and WIP has been replicated nationwide. A followup study indicates there is a significant retention of learning by students.
The appendices include three Wright state University School of Medicine news releases. (SM)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Alcohol Abuse
Counseling Services
Drug Abuse
Drug Addiction
Drug Education
Health Activities
Higher Education
Intervention
Medical Education
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Models
Outreach Programs
Program Descriptions
Social Problems
State Universities
Substance Abuse
Traffic Safety
Identifier: Wright State University OH; AASCU ERIC Model Programs Inventory Project
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Date of Entry: 1989
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Changing Character of Drug Abuse: The Federal Response. Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of
Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session on "Where Should the Federal Drug Abuse Policy be Headed in the 1980's?".

Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.
1979 English Document (ED) 185

This document represents the testimony given before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce of the House of Representatives on November 30,
1979. These presentations address the following areas of concern: (1) New York state services and commissions established to deal with drug abuse; (2) federal financial assistance for national and
state drug abuse programs; (3) marihuana and heroin use by young adults; (4) methadone maintenance treatment programs; and (5) drug use/abuse by the elderly....

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED188035
Title: The Changing Character of Drug Abuse: The Federal Response. Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,
House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session on "Where Should the Federal Drug Abuse Policy be Headed in the 1980's?".
Access ERIC: FullText
Corp Author(s): Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.
Publication: 1979-11-30
Description: 185 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This document represents the testimony given before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce of the House of
Representatives on November 30, 1979. These presentations address the following areas of concern: (1) New York state services and commissions established to deal with drug abuse; (2) federal
financial assistance for national and state drug abuse programs; (3) marihuana and heroin use by young adults; (4) methadone maintenance treatment programs; and (5) drug use/abuse by the elderly.
Additional material submitted for the record includes articles on accidental drug addiction, sales of illegal drugs, drug treatment programs sponsored by the New York City Board of Education and the
New York State Commission on Alcohol and Substance Abuse Prevention and Education, and reports of substance abuse incidents in emergency rooms and medical examiner offices. (HLM)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Adolescents
Drug Abuse
Federal Programs
Federal State Relationship
Illegal Drug Use
Older Adults
State Programs
Young Adults
Youth Problems
Identifier: New York; Congress 96th; New York
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Date of Entry: 1980
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Applied Communication, Argumentation, and Debate: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1979 (Vol. 40 Nos. 1 through 6).

ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
1979 English Document (ED) 14

This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 16 titles deal with the following topics: the use of mass distribution as a
method of diffusing ideas on college campuses; compliance-gaining message selection; the rhetoric of Divorced Catholics Groups and the founding of a national organization; the conceptual foundations
of communication and their implications for school personnel in devising and selecting strategies for communicating with their publics; the Newspaper in Education Program in Maryland; communication
behavior patterns of academic educators; verbal participation and outcomes in medical education; leadership communication style, group response, and problem solving effectiveness; communication
behaviors of short-term imprisoned women; source credibility and persuasion; the effects of camera shot and witness type on jurors' responses to a videotaped deposition; attitude change from
forewarning and its relationship to the listener's choice and the listener's prior attitude toward the topic; the rhetoric of collective bargaining in higher education; communication influences on
selected substance abuse behavior in Mexico City; communication training of staff nurses; and the cognitive structure/cognitive response model of communication impact. (FL)

Availability: Connect to the Mirlyn catalog at the University of Michigan
Accession No: ED181524
Title: Applied Communication, Argumentation, and Debate: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1979 (Vol. 40 Nos.
1 through 6).
Access ERIC: FullText
Corp Author(s): ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
Publication: 1979-00-00
Description: 14 p.
Language: English
Abstract: This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 16 titles deal with the following topics: the use of mass
distribution as a method of diffusing ideas on college campuses; compliance-gaining message selection; the rhetoric of Divorced Catholics Groups and the founding of a national organization; the
conceptual foundations of communication and their implications for school personnel in devising and selecting strategies for communicating with their publics; the Newspaper in Education Program in
Maryland; communication behavior patterns of academic educators; verbal participation and outcomes in medical education; leadership communication style, group response, and problem solving
effectiveness; communication behaviors of short-term imprisoned women; source credibility and persuasion; the effects of camera shot and witness type on jurors' responses to a videotaped deposition;
attitude change from forewarning and its relationship to the listener's choice and the listener's prior attitude toward the topic; the rhetoric of collective bargaining in higher education;
communication influences on selected substance abuse behavior in Mexico City; communication training of staff nurses; and the cognitive structure/cognitive response model of communication impact. (FL)
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: Annotated Bibliographies
Behavior Patterns
Discourse Analysis
Higher Education
Listening Skills
Research
Rhetoric
Teaching Methods
Verbal Communication
(Major): Communication Research
Communication (Thought Transfer)
Debate
Doctoral Dissertations
Persuasive Discourse
Speech Communication
Document Type: Document (ED)
Publication Type: Collected Works - Serials; Reference Materials - Bibliographies; Reports - Research
Date of Entry: 1980; RIEJUN1980
Provider: OCLC
Database: ERIC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Download All Files (To download individual files, select them in the “Files” panel above)

Best for data sets < 3 GB. Downloads all files plus metadata into a zip file.



Best for data sets > 3 GB. Globus is the platform Deep Blue Data uses to make large data sets available.   More about Globus