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Effects of habitat and location on Chipping Sparrow song characteristics

dc.contributor.authorBrandley, Nicholas
dc.coverage.spatialUMBS Campusen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-14T14:38:01Z
dc.date.available2007-12-14T14:38:01Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/57457
dc.descriptionNatural History & Evolutionen_US
dc.description.abstractThe acoustic adaptation hypothesis states that animal calls should adapt to their environment: birds singing in a closed forest should have lower frequency and slower rate than birds in open habitats in order for their songs to be heard best at far distances. To test the acoustic adaptation hypothesis in Chipping Sparrow song, we recorded and analyzed maximum frequency, minimum frequency, frequency range, and trill rate of Chipping Sparrows in two different habitat types. We found no statistically significant results, but all four song characteristics slightly opposed the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Although Chipping Sparrows may not follow the predictions of the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, insignificant results should not be interpreted as rejecting the acoustic adaptation hypothesis in Chipping Sparrows as their interactions with neighboring Pine Warblers, our small sample size, closeness of sites, and little habitat differences could have altered our results.en_US
dc.format.extent128447 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.titleEffects of habitat and location on Chipping Sparrow song characteristicsen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environment
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScience
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/57457/1/Brandley_Nicholas_2007.pdfen_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


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