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dc.contributor.authorHo, N. F. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCondie, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJetzer, W. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Gordon L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHusari, N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHuq, A. S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:43:27Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:43:27Z
dc.date.issued1986-09en_US
dc.identifier.citationHuq, A. S.; Ho, N. F. H.; Husari, N.; Flynn, G. L.; Jetzer, W. E.; Condie, L.; (1986). "Permeation of water contaminative phenols through hairless mouse skin." Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 15(5): 557-566. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48064>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0090-4341en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-0703en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48064
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=3753043&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractAs a means of determining the risk of absorption of water contaminative phenolic compounds through the skin, the permeation of a number of phenols, all on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's list of priority pollutants, through hairless mouse skin has been studied, using in vitro diffusion cell methods. Experimentally determined permeability coefficients through intact skin and stratum corneum denuded skin and permeability coefficients derived therefrom for the viable tissue layer and the stratum corneum, which are the tissue's major contributing substrata, have been correlated with their log K octanol/water partition coefficients. Permeability coefficients for the whole skin and the stratum corneum systematically increased with increasing phenol lipophilicity to limiting values of about 0.15 and 0.30 cm/hr, respectively. The values of the permeability coefficients for the viable tissue were roughly the same for all compounds (≈0.36 cm/hr). Because of the inductive effects of Cl and NO 2 substituents on the aromatic ring, phenolic analogs containing these moieties are acidic and, consequently, their overall skin permeabilities were highly pH-dependent in the range of pH values seen for surface waters. High fluxes were noted for such phenols at low pH, where they exist essentially in a non-ionized state. Though low, fluxes of the compounds were measurable at pH's ≫ pK a 's, indicating that phenolic anions also pass through the skin. With the exceptions of relatively polar phenol and the mono-nitro phenols, the free acid forms of all the phenols studied permeated skin with ease and at rates approaching those of denuded skin. The intact skin permeability coefficient of the free acid form of 4-nitro phenol was exceptionally low, which suggests that it might associate intermolecularly.en_US
dc.format.extent939155 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag; Springer-Verlag New York Inc.en_US
dc.subject.otherWaste Management/Waste Technologyen_US
dc.subject.otherTerrestrial Pollutionen_US
dc.subject.otherEnvironment, Generalen_US
dc.subject.otherAgricultureen_US
dc.subject.otherEnvironmenten_US
dc.subject.otherForestryen_US
dc.subject.otherEcologyen_US
dc.subject.otherSoil Science & Conservationen_US
dc.subject.otherWaste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollutionen_US
dc.titlePermeation of water contaminative phenols through hairless mouse skinen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPublic Healthen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Michigan, 48109-1065, Ann Arbor, Michigan; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West St. Clair St., 05268, Cincinnati, Ohioen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Michigan, 48109-1065, Ann Arbor, Michigan; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West St. Clair St., 05268, Cincinnati, Ohio; Pharmacy Research Unit, The Upjohn Co., 49001, Kalamazoo, MIen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Michigan, 48109-1065, Ann Arbor, Michigan; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West St. Clair St., 05268, Cincinnati, Ohioen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Michigan, 48109-1065, Ann Arbor, Michigan; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West St. Clair St., 05268, Cincinnati, Ohio; Kantonsspital Bruderholz Pharmaceutical Department, CH-4101, Bruderholz, BL, Switzerlanden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Michigan, 48109-1065, Ann Arbor, Michigan; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West St. Clair St., 05268, Cincinnati, Ohio; Squibb Institute for Medical Research, P. O. Box 191, 08903, New Brunswick, NJen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Michigan, 48109-1065, Ann Arbor, Michigan; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West St. Clair St., 05268, Cincinnati, Ohioen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.identifier.pmid3753043en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/48064/1/244_2005_Article_BF01056570.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01056570en_US
dc.identifier.sourceArchives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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